Mark Twain: A Biography ; the Personal and Literary Life of Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Volume 4

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Harper, 1912 - Authors, American - 1718 pages
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Contents

I
1257
II
1266
III
1272
IV
1279
V
1287
VI
1291
VII
1295
VIII
1299
XXXI
1446
XXXII
1454
XXXIII
1455
XXXIV
1458
XXXV
1460
XXXVI
1464
XXXVII
1470
XXXVIII
1474

IX
1307
X
1315
XI
1321
XII
1324
XIII
1333
XIV
1339
XV
1352
XVI
1364
XVII
1366
XVIII
1371
XIX
1376
XX
1380
XXI
1392
XXII
1397
XXIII
1405
XXIV
1411
XXV
1418
XXVI
1425
XXVII
1430
XXVIII
1432
XXIX
1434
XXX
1442
XXXIX
1478
XL
1484
XLI
1490
XLII
1493
XLIII
1496
XLIV
1503
XLV
1506
XLVI
1516
XLVII
1521
XLVIII
1523
XLIX
1526
L
1536
LI
1541
LII
1547
LIII
1555
LIV
1558
LV
1564
LVI
1575
LVII
1579
LVIII
1581
LIX
1586
Copyright

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Page 1502 - not good for the Christian's health To hurry the Aryan brown, For the Christian riles and the Aryan smiles, And he weareth the Christian down; And the end of the fight is a tombstone white And the name of the late deceased: And the epitaph drear: "A fool lies here Who tried to hustle the East.
Page 1721 - This preservation photocopy was made and hand bound at BookLab, Inc., in compliance with copyright law. The paper is Weyerhaeuser Cougar Opaque Natural, which exceeds ANSI Standard Z39.48-l984. l993
Page 1539 - the margin: But, dear sir, you are forgetting that what a man sees in the human race is merely himself in the deep and honest privacy of his own heart. Byron despised the race because he despised himself. I feel as Byron did, and for the same reason. Do you admire the race (& consequently yourself)?
Page 1647 - Why, my dear sir, these were not the gracious singers to whom we and the world pay loving reverence and homage; these were impostors." The miner investigated me with a calm eye for a while; then said he, "Ahl
Page 1652 - Unconditional and immediate surrender," "I propose to move immediately upon your works," "I propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer." Mr. Arnold would doubtless claim that that last phrase is not strictly grammatical, and yet it did certainly wake up this nation as a hundred million tons of
Page 1500 - When I take up one of Jane Austen's books," he said, " such as Pride and Prejudice, I feel like a barkeeper entering the kingdom of heaven. I know what his sensation would be and his private comments. He would not find the place to his taste, and he would probably say so.
Page 1259 - To MARK TWAIN from THE CLANSMEN Will ye no come back again? Will ye no come back again? Better lo'ed ye canna be, Will ye no come back again?
Page 1607 - so I don't want to hear from you any more. I think you are the very same man who read me a long lecture last week about the degrading vice of smoking cigars and then came back, in my absence, with your vile, reprehensible fire-proof gloves on, and carried off my beautiful
Page 1643 - Address of Samuel L. Clemens (Mark Twain) from a report of the dinner given by the publishers of the Atlantic Monthly in honor of the Seventieth Anniversary of the Birth of John Greenleaf Whittier, at the Hotel Brunswick, Boston, December 17, 1877, as published in the Boston Evening
Page 1580 - I looked a moment at the face I knew so well; and it was patient with the patience I had so often seen in it: something of a puzzle, a great silent dignity, an assent to what must be from the depths of a nature whose tragical seriousness broke in the laughter which the unwise took for the whole of him.

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