Marmalade

Front Cover
Sunstone Press, 2004 - Fiction - 169 pages
0 Reviews
A black man retrieves his family history from the jumble of papers tenaciously guarded by an aged white cousin. Low income residents of an inner city apartment house rescue Santa from a balky elevator. Black widow spiders exact revenge on a conniving maid. A pet pig turns a young girl's life inside out. Spectacles left in an ancient Spanish cathedral arouse the saints. A difficult personal decision draws a teenager and her mother closer together. And, guests at an old plantation lick marmalade off sticky fingers as they listen to their hostess recount the tale of a young mother's burial alive. A quiet corner, a comfy chair by a crackling fire, and these stories. Bitter-sweet. To be sampled slowly for they linger on the tongue. Each of these stories highlights the elusive connections between past and present, dreams and waking, the visible and the invisible. Elizabeth Muldrow gathers up these mysteries and dissects them to reveal gentle--and sometimes not so gentle--truths that are both startling and inspiring. ELIZABETH MULDROW says of retirement that it frees one.to be busy. In her case to write and to travel. The stories in this collection grow out of her recent wanderings, in Spain, in the South of her husband's heritage, the Northeast of her own childhood and the Midwest of her first ventures into the wider world. Professionally Muldrow has taught social studies and English language arts in Pennsylvania, Ethiopia, and Colorado. An ordained Presbyterian clergywoman she has designed bi-lingual curricula for remote tribal schools, written for denominational journals, served on regional and national committees and resourced gatherings nation wide.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
11
III
27
IV
43
V
53
VI
65
VII
76
VIII
86
IX
99
X
119
XI
131
XII
145
XIII
162
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - Why? How can I? The past is the present, isn't it? It's the future, too. We all try to lie out of that but life won't let us.
Page 22 - Karenin arc few, and when she feels Vronsky is falling out of love with her. Her decision to ask Karenin for a divorce is a stratagem to justify going with Vronsky to Moscow. He had announced to her that he would have to leave her for a while to take care of some business matters, and she had angrily insisted on accompanying him. When he coldly insists on going alone, she impulsively announces that she will write to Karenin for a divorce and, by that strategy, gains the right to accompany Vronsky....

Bibliographic information