Marriage and the family in the Middle Ages

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Harper & Row, 1987 - History - 372 pages
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Historians have only recently awakened to the importance of the family, the basic social unit throughout human history. This book traces the development of marriage and the family from the Middle Ages to the early modern era. It describes how the Roman and barbarian cultural streams merged under the influence of the Christian church to forge new concepts, customs, laws, and practices. Century by century it follows the development -- sometimes gradual, at other times revolutionary -- of significant elements in the history of the family Book jacket.

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Marriage and the family in the Middle Ages

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Two experienced popular historians have assembled a well-researched and well-written overview of a lively topic in medieval scholarship, the history of the family. They start from the Roman, Germanic ... Read full review

Contents

Historians Discover the Family
3
Roman German Christian
16
500700
45
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

Frances and Joseph Gies have been writing books about medieval history for thirty years. Together and separately, they are the authors of more than twenty books, including "Life in a Medieval City, Life in a Medieval Castle, Life in a Medieval Village, The Knight in History, " and "Cathedral, Forge, and Waterwheel." They live near Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Joseph Gies was born on October 8, 1916 in Ann Arbor, Mich and attended the University of Michigan and Columbia University. He held jobs with several publishers including Encyclopaedia Britannica, and was editor-in-chief for a division of Doubleday. Gies is best known for several books, such as Life in a Medieval Castle, Life in a Medieval City, and Life in a Medieval Village. These books, written with his wife Frances Carney, explore existence in Medieval times. The works, and his others, are noted for their highly readable, but thorough quality. Topics such as archaeology, government, dining, entertainment, and daily life are presented in fascinating detail.

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