Marriages of the deaf in America

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Volta Bureau, 1898 - 527 pages
 

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Page 111 - but, so far as I am aware, no attempt has hitherto been made to ascertain the results of consanguineous marriages of deaf persons. Indeed, the probable results of such marriages have scarcely been considered, except briefly by Dr. Bell in an Appendix to an Address on the subject of Marriage, delivered before the
Page 26 - that marriages in which both of the partners are deaf are somewhat less productive than marriages in which one of the partners is deaf and the other is a hearing person. * Marriages of the deaf resulting in offspring. Both partners deaf One partner deaf; the other hearing One partner deaf ; the other
Page 53 - Dr. Bell laid special emphasis upon the more remote results which he believed would follow marriages in which both of the partners were congenitally deaf, formulating the theory thus : " If the laws of heredity that are known to hold in the case of animals also apply to man, the intermarriage of congenital deaf-mutes through a num•
Page 28 - Taking the deaf as a whole, without regard to the character of the deafness, marriages in which both of the partners are deaf are not more liable to result in deaf offspring than marriages in which one of the partners is deaf and the other is a hearing person. The
Page 54 - ber of successive generations should result in the formation of a deaf variety of the human race."* The theory as thus formulated has been accepted by such eminent men of science as Francis Galton in England.t Alphonse de
Page 27 - more liable to result in deaf offspring than marriages in which one of the partners is deaf and the other is a hearing person ? In seeking an answer to this question I shall pursue the same method as in Chapter I, regarding
Page 55 - the eminent French authority on heredity, quoting Mr. Sedgwick's suggestion without expressing dissent, says: "Many physiologists have thought that when both parents present the same characteristics heredity may acquire such power as to destroy itself." Darwin also cites Mr. Sedgwick's remark, but wisely adds that " it is as searching and exhaustive as the data at
Page 111 - CHAPTER V. CONSANGUINEOUS MARRIAGES OF THE DEAF. WHEN pupils are admitted to American schools for the deaf the question is usually asked whether their parents were related by blood, and from the replies to this question statistics have been collated showing a considerable percentage of deaf children born from consanguineous marriages in general

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