Marriages of the Deaf in America: An Inquiry Concerning the Results of Marriages of the Deaf in America

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Gibson Bros., Printers and Bookbinders, 1898 - Deaf - 527 pages
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Page 113 - ... so far as I am aware, no attempt has hitherto been made to ascertain the results of consanguineous marriages of deaf persons.
Page 122 - Under all circumstances it is exceedingly dangerous for a deaf person to marry a blood relative, no matter whether the relative is deaf or hearing, nor whether the deafness of either or both or neither of the partners is congenital, nor whether either or both or neither have other deaf relatives besides the other partner.
Page 129 - The questions to be elucidated were as follows : — (1) Are marriages of deaf persons more liable to result in deaf offspring than ordinary marriages ? (2) Are marriages in which both of the partners are deaf more liable to result in deaf offspring than marriages in which one of the partners is deaf and the other is a hearing person...
Page 58 - If the laws of heredity that are known to hold in the case of animals also apply to man, the intermarriage of congenital deaf-mutes through a number of successive generations should result in the formation of a deaf variety of the human race.
Page 4 - the evidence shows a tendency to the formation of a deaf variety of the human race in America...
Page 32 - ... have deaf children ? If so, how are these classes respectively composed, and what are the conditions that increase or diminish this liability? (4) Aside from the question of the liability of the offspring to deafness, are marriages in which both of the partners are deaf more likely to result happily than marriages in which one of the partners is deaf and the other a hearing person? These are questions which have been submitted to considerable discussion both in Europe and America, with the result...
Page 60 - When the deafness of the parent reappears in the offspring, what is really transmitted and inherited is not deafness, but some anomaly of the auditory organs or of the nervous system, or the tendency to some disease of which deafness is but the result or the symptom.
Page 54 - ... of this chapter, then, must be answered in the affirmative. Marriages of the congenitally deaf are far more liable to result in deaf offspring than marriages of the adventitiously deaf. This conclusion is in accordance with the generally accepted law of heredity that congenital or innate characteristics are far more likely to be transmitted to the offspring than acquired characteristics. Indeed, some of the most eminent hereditarians believe that acquired characteristics are never transmitted....
Page 127 - A report on marriage and divorce in the United States, 1867 to 1886; including an appendix relating to marriage and divorce in certain countries in Europe.
Page 133 - Accurate data as to the proportion of deaf children born of ordinary marriages are not easily obtainable, but that proportion is probably less than no per cent. On the other hand, marriages of the deaf are far more likely to result in hearing offspring, the proportion of hearing children being 75 per cent. These results are in accordance with the two laws of heredity: (i) that a physical anomaly tends to be transmitted to the offspring, and (2) that offspring tend to revert to the normal type. There...

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