The Suicide Run

Front Cover
Vintage, 2011 - Short stories - 194 pages
2 Reviews

The five personal and intensely powerful tales that make up this collection draw upon William Styron's real-life experiences in the US Marine Corps, and give us an insight into the early life of one of America's greatest modern writers.

The stories are set in the gruelling camps and sweltering training fields which mark the limbo point between civilian life and the horrors of war. The stories tell of young men embarking on suicidal 1000 mile roundtrips to New York to see their girlfriends on 36 hour leave periods; the surreal experience of being conscripted for a second time to serve in the Korean War; and the frustration and isolation of returning home when service is over.

The Suicide Run brings to life the drama, inhumanity, absurdity and heroism that forever changed the men who served in the Marine Corps.

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - buffalogr - LibraryThing

Two and a half Harry Bosch stories -- two are great and reflect his greatness as reflected through the author. Great whodunits. I was a little peeved that the third read/listen was just the first few chapters of another book. I hate it when they do that! Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - smik - LibraryThing

This short story collection, quickly read, is an excellent reminder of what is so good about the Harry Bosch stories. SUICIDE RUN is the perfect illustration of the fact that Harry Bosch always picks ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2011)

William Styron (1925-2006), a native of the Tidewater region of Virginia, was a graduate of Duke University and a veteran of the Marine Corps. His books include Lie Down in Darkness, The Long March, Set This House on Fire, The Confessions of Nat Turner, Sophie's Choice, This Quiet Dust, Darkness Visible and A Tidewater Morning. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, the Howells Medal, the American Book Award and the Legion d'Honneur. With his wife, the poet and activist Rose Styron, he lived for most of his adult life in Roxbury, Connecticut, and in Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts.

Bibliographic information