Martin Luther: A Very Short Introduction

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OUP Oxford, Oct 21, 2010 - Religion - 144 pages
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This introduction presents Martin Luther as historians now see him. Instead of singling him out as a modern hero, the book emphasizes the context in which Luther worked, the colleagues who supported him, and the opponents who adamantly opposed his agenda for change. Scott H. Hendrix explains the religious reformation and Luther's importance, without ignoring the political and cultural forces that led the reformation down paths Luther could neither foresee nor influence. This Very Short Introduction pays tribute to Luther's genius, but also recognizes the self-righteous attitude that alienated contemporaries, offering a unique explanation for that behaviour. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
 

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Contents

Foreword
List of illustrations
Chapter 1Luther and the Reformation
Chapter 2Becoming a reformer
Chapter 3The labours of reform
Chapter 4Luthers Bible
Chapter 5The new Christianity
Chapter 6The political reformation
Chapter 7From monk to family man
Chapter 8Angels and demons
Afterword
References and further reading
Chronology
Glossary and biography
Index
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Scott H. Hendrix is Professor Emeritus of Reformation History at Princeton Theological Seminary. He currently chairs the Continuation Committee of the International Congress for Luther Research. His publications include Luther and the Papacy: Stages in A Reformation Conflict (1981), Tradition and Authority in the Reformation (1996), Preaching the Reformation (2003), and Luther (2009).

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