Mary Grew, Abolitionist and Feminist, 1813-1896

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Susquehanna University Press, 1991 - Biography & Autobiography - 214 pages
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This is the first full-length biography of Mary Grew (1813-96), an American abolitionist and feminist, who worked steadily in the antislavery crusade from 1834 to 1865, in the Negro suffrage campaign from 1865 to 1870, and in the woman's rights movements from 1848 to 1892, her eightieth year.
 

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Contents

An Antislavery Apprenticeship 18131840
13
Broadening Fields of Service 18401850
29
Toward Civil War 18501861
46
The Day of Jubilee 18611865
71
Battling for Negro Suffrage 18651867
96
Dissolving the Antislavery Societies 18671870
115
The Campaign for Woman Suffrage 18691873
134
Keeping the Faith 18731896
153
In Retrospect
172
Notes
177
Bibliography
200
Index
209
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Page 20 - It resolved that prejudice against color was the very spirit of slavery and that it was "the duty of abolitionists to identify themselves with these oppressed Americans, by sitting with them in places of worship, by appearing with them in our streets, by giving them our countenance in steamboats and stages, by visiting them at their homes and encouraging them to visit us, receiving them as we do our white fellow citizens.

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