Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Front Cover
Harold Bloom
Infobase Publishing, 2007 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 256 pages
Perhaps best recognized for the horror films it has spawned, Frankenstein, written by 19-year-old Mary Shelley, was first published in 1818. Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus, warns against irresponsible science, technology, and parenting, and made readers reconsider who the world's monsters really are and how society contributes to creating them. Whether for research or general interest, Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations furnishes students with a collection of the most insightful critical essays available on this Gothic thriller, selected from a variety of literary sources. Completely updated and incorporating at least 50 percent new material, this convenient study guide—with chronology, contributor biographical information, and bibliography—is ideal for those working on thematic papers.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Monster
13
Frankensteins Fallen Angel
29
Making a Monster
43
Frankensteins Monster and Images of Racein NineteenthCentury Britain
61
Literate Species
95
Facing the Ugly
125
Passages in Mary Shelleys Frankenstein
149
The Political Geography of Horrorin Mary Shelleys Frankenstein
185
Frankenstein Invisibility and Nameless Dread
213
Chronology
235
Contributors
239
Bibliography
241
Acknowledgments
245
Index
247
Copyright

Acts of Becoming
167

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About the author (2007)

Harold Bloom was born on July 11, 1930 in New York City. He earned his Bachelor of Arts from Cornell in 1951 and his Doctorate from Yale in 1955. After graduating from Yale, Bloom remained there as a teacher, and was made Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1983. Bloom's theories have changed the way that critics think of literary tradition and has also focused his attentions on history and the Bible. He has written over twenty books and edited countless others. He is one of the most famous critics in the world and considered an expert in many fields. In 2010 he became a founding patron of Ralston College, a new institution in Savannah, Georgia, that focuses on primary texts. His works include Fallen Angels, Till I End My Song: A Gathering of Last Poems, Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life and The Shadow of a Great Rock: A Literary Appreciation of The King James Bible.

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