Masons, Tricksters and Cartographers: Comparative Studies in the Sociology of Scientific and Indigenous Knowledge

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Taylor & Francis, Sep 2, 2003 - Social Science - 276 pages
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In an eclectic and highly original study, Turnbull brings together traditions as diverse as cathedral building, Micronesian navigation, cartography and turbulence research. He argues that all our differing ways of producing knowledge - including science - are messy, spatial and local. Every culture has its own ways of assembling local knowledge, thereby creating space thrugh the linking of people, practices and places. The spaces we inhabit and assemblages we work with are not as homogenous and coherent as our modernist perspectives have led us to believe - rather they are complex and heterogeneous motleys.
 

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Contents

From rationality to messiness Rethinking technoscientific knowledge
ix
On with the motley The contingent assemblage of knowledge spaces
17
Talk templates and tradition How the masons built Chartres Cathedral without plans
51
Tricksters and cartographers Maps science and the state in the making of a modern scientific knowledge space
87
Pacific navigation An Alternative scientific tradition
129
Making malaria curable Extending a knowledge space to create a vaccine
159
Messiness and order in turbulence research
181
Rationality relativism and the politics of knowledge
207
Bibliography
231
Index
257
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