Masterclass: Learning, Teaching

Front Cover
Peter Knight
Bloomsbury Publishing, Sep 1, 1997 - Education - 208 pages
0 Reviews
In the English-speaking world, master's degree programmes are booming. Not only are more programmes being provided, with more people studying for master's degrees, but the nature of the degree itself is changing: it has become essentially a professional degree. In respone to market forces, a variety of approaches to curriculum design, teaching, learning and assessment have evolved. This text considers evidence and experiences of academics in South Africa, the USA, Australia and Britain, creating an overall picture of developments, accompanied by a set of practical and conceptual problems.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Learning Teaching and Curriculum in Taught Masters Courses
1
2 Standards and Quality in Taught Masters Programmes
16
The Place of Experience
28
An Australian Perspective on Adult Education
39
5 Supporting Masters Degree Students
53
A North American Experience
63
7 A Masters Programme that Matters to the New South Africa
73
The Experience of Taught Masters Courses in British Geography Departments
85
10 Learning from the Experience of the Essex MBA
105
11 A Womens Studies MA
115
12 Mathematical Studies in Northern Ireland
125
13 Building Interdisciplinary Teams Online in Rural Health Care
137
Diversity Markets Regulation and Equity
149
References
161
Index
168
Copyright

A North American View
96

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1997)

Peter Knight is at the Department of Educational Research, University of Lancaster

Bibliographic information