Masterpieces of Eloquence: Famous Orations of Great World Leaders from Early Greece to the Present Time, Volume 14

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P. F. Collier & Son, 1905 - Speeches, addresses, etc
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Page 5928 - Perhaps the time has already come when it ought to be and will be something else; when 'the sluggard intellect of this continent will look from under its iron lids and fill the postponed expectation of the world with something better than the exertions of mechanical skill. Our day of dependence, our long apprenticeship to the learning of other lands, draws to a close.
Page 5934 - The book, the college, the school of art, the institution of any kind stop with some past utterance of genius. This is good, say they — let us hold by this. They pin me down. They look backward and not forward. But genius looks forward; the eyes of man are set in his forehead, not in his hindhead; man hopes; genius creates.
Page 5951 - We will walk on our own feet; we will work with our own hands; we will speak our own minds. The study of letters shall be no longer a name for pity, for doubt, and for sensual indulgence.
Page 5948 - ... suburbs and extremities of Nature ; let me see every trifle bristling with the polarity that ranges it instantly on an eternal law ; and the shop, the plough, and the ledger, referred to the like cause by which light undulates and poets sing ; — and the world lies no longer a dull miscellany and lumber-room, but has form and order ; there is no trifle ; there is no puzzle ; but one design unites and animates the farthest pinnacle and the lowest trench.
Page 5936 - He that would bring home the wealth of the Indies, must carry out the wealth of the Indies." There is then creative reading as well as creative writing. When the mind is braced by labor and invention, the page of whatever book we read becomes luminous with manifold allusion. Every sentence is doubly significant, and the sense of our author is as broad as the world.
Page 5947 - If there ia any period one would desire to be born in, is it not the age of Revolution; when the old and the new stand side by side, and admit of being compared; when the energies of all men are searched by fear and by hope; when the historic glories of the old can be compensated by the rich possibilities of the new era?
Page 5940 - Character is higher than intellect. Thinking is the function. Living is the functionary. The stream retreats to its source. A great soul will be strong to live, as well as strong to think.
Page 5929 - The old fable covers a doctrine ever new and sublime; that there is One Man, — present to all particular men only partially, or through one faculty; and that you must take the whole society to find the whole man.
Page 5939 - ... of the breath; in desire and satiety; in the ebb and flow of the sea; in day and night; in heat and cold; and as yet more deeply ingrained in every atom and every fluid, is known to us under the name of Polarity, - these "fits of easy transmission and reflection," as Newton called them, are the law of nature because they are the law of spirit.
Page 5930 - The first in time and the first in importance of the influences upon the mind is that of nature. Every day, the sun ; and, after sunset, night and her stars. • Ever the winds blow ; ever the grass grows. Every day, men and women, conversing, beholding and beholden. The scholar is he of all men whom this spectacle most engages.

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