Materials for German Prose Composition, Or, Selecions from Modern English Writers: With Grammatical Notes, Idiomatic Renderings of Difficult Phrases, Essentials of German Syntax, Preliminary Chapters on Punctuation and the Division of Words in German, and a Grammatical Index

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G. Bell, 1891 - German language - 276 pages
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Page 229 - The chess-board is the world, the pieces are the phenomena of the Universe, the rules of the game are what we call the laws of Nature. The player on the other side is hidden from us. We know that his play is always fair, just and patient But also we know, to our cost, that he never overlooks a mistake, or makes the smallest allowance for ignorance.
Page 256 - An Elementary Treatise on Mensuration. By BT Moore, MA 5s. ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY AND DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS. An Introduction to Analytical Plane Geometry. By WP Turnbull, MA 8vo. 12s. Problems on the Principles of Plane Co-ordinate Geometry. By W. Walton, MA 8vo. 16s. Trilinear Co-ordinates, and Modern Analytical Geometry of Two Dimensions.
Page 229 - My metaphor will remind some of you of the famous picture in which Eetzsch has depicted Satan playing at chess with man for his soul. Substitute for the mocking fiend in that picture a calm, strong angel who is playing for love, as we say, and would rather lose than win — and I should accept it as an image of human life.
Page 228 - Suppose it were perfectly certain that the life ,and fortune of every one of us would, one day or other, depend upon his winning or losing a game of chess. Don't you think that we should all consider it to be a primary duty to learn at least the names and the moves of the pieces; to have a notion of a gambit, and a keen eye for all the means of giving and getting out of check?
Page 229 - In other words, education is the instruction of the intellect in the laws of Nature, under which name I include not merely things and their forces, but men and their ways ; and the fashioning of the affections and of the will into an earnest and loving desire to move in harmony with those laws.
Page 173 - ... there was an undefined sense of reconcilement with her brother : what quarrel, what harshness, what unbelief in each other can subsist in the presence of a great calamity, when all the artificial vesture of our life is gone, and we are all one with each other in primitive mortal needs ? Vaguely, Maggie felt this. — in the strong resurgent love towards her brother, that swept away all the later impressions of hard, cruel offence and misunderstanding, and left only the deep, underlying, unshakable...
Page 7 - The Elements of General History. By Prof. Tytler. New Edition, brought down to 1874. Small post 8vo.
Page 172 - The whole thing had been so rapid, so dream-like, that the threads of ordinary association were broken; she sank down on the seat clutching the oar mechanically, and for a long while had no distinct conception of her position. The first thing that waked her to fuller consciousness was the cessation of the rain, and a perception that the darkness was divided by the faintest light, which parted the overhanging gloom from the immeasurable watery level below.
Page 153 - My delight in those days was to make caricatures for children. I was touched to find that they were remembered, and some even kept until the present time ; and very proud to be told, as a lad, that the great Goethe had looked at some of them.
Page 171 - ... in prose — and in hasty prose too; for I am at present on my voyage to Greece once more, and surrounded by hurry and bustle, which hardly allow a moment even to gratitude and admiration to express themselves. I sailed from Genoa some days ago, was driven back by a gale of wind, and have since sailed again and arrived here, 'Leghorn', this morning, to receive on board some Greek passengers for their struggling country.

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