Materials for a History of the Sessions Family in America: The Descendants of Alexander Sessions of Andover, Mass., 1669

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Munsell's sons, 1890 - 252 pages
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Page 242 - All things are lawful unto me, but all things are not expedient: all things are lawful for me, but I will not be brought under the power of any.
Page 188 - You'd scarce expect one of my age, To speak in public on the stage ; And if I chance to fall below Demosthenes or Cicero, Don't view me with a critic's eye, But pass my imperfections by. Large streams from little fountains flow; Tall oaks from little acorns grow...
Page 154 - ... buildings and the State offices. North of what is now Spring street, east of Fourth street, south of the county buildings, could hardly be found a business ho.use; while dwellings were far apart and in many places not to be seen. On the west was the Scioto river, on whose banks in the southwestern part of town were many warehouses and docks, for at that time her shipping trade was a considerable factor in her growth. Up the river, on its opposite bank, about a mile to the northwest, lay the village...
Page 164 - ... admiration of all who knew him. His name frequently appears on the records of the work of the Sanitary Commission at the West, in which, though an unpaid, he was a most earnest and faithful worker, and it is probable there are few to whom this imperfect tribute will convey any new impressions in regard to the value of the services which he rendered to the cause of the country and humanity during the war. Throughout the existence of the Home at Columbus, Mr. Sessions gave it his constant supervision,...
Page 149 - ... chests thrown overboard. Perfect regularity prevailed during the whole transaction. Although there were many people on the wharf, entire silence prevailed — no clamor, no talking. Nothing was meddled with but the teas on board. After having •emptied the whole the deck was swept clean, and everything put in its proper place. An officer on board was requested to come up from the cabin and see that no damage was done, except to the tea.
Page 150 - No silk-robed dames, no fiddling band, No flowers, no songs, no dancing, — A tribe of red men, axe in hand, — , Behold the guests advancing ! How fast the stragglers join the throng, From stall and workshop gathered ! The lively barber skips along And leaves a chin...
Page 160 - Surgeon-General of the State, and both in his individual and official character contributed largely to the results at which we aimed. Mr. Sessions, another member of the Columbus branch, was one of the earliest volunteers who took the field to minister to the wants of the sick and suffering in the army. He accompanied us on the Allen Collier in our memorable trip to Fort Donelson, and went to Pittsburgh Landing immediately after the battle, where he was connected with the great work accomplished...
Page 241 - ... was very scarce in that section of the country, when they had little to eat but potatoes and salt, the good deacon saw a deer come out of the woods near his house, late one Sunday afternoon; he seized his gun and shot the deer. For this the church brought him up for discipline. He pleaded that it was a work of necessity and of mercy, and that he was justified in killing this game, so providentially brought within reach of his trusty gun, even if it was before sunset on Sunday. The church, however,-...
Page 148 - I was living in Boston at the time, in the family of a Mr. Davis, a lumber merchant, as a common laborer. On that eventful evening, when Mr. Davis came in from the town meeting, I asked him what was to be done with the tea. 'They are now throwing it overboard,' he replied. Receiving permission, I went immediately to the spot. Everything was as light as day, by the means of lamps and torches; a pin might -be seen lying on the wharf. I went on board where they were at work, and took hold with my own...
Page 149 - At about the close of the scene a man was discovered making his way through the crowd with his pockets filled with tea. He was immedately laid hold of and his coat skirts torn off with their pockets and thrown into the dock with the rest of the tea. ' ' I was obliged to leave the town at once as it was of course known that I was concerned in the affair.

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