Mathematical Puzzles, Volume 1

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1959 - Games - 167 pages
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Bizarre imagination, originality, trickiness, and whimsy characterize puzzles of Sam Loyd, America's greatest puzzler. Present selection from fabulously rare Cyclopedia includes the famous 14–15 puzzles, the Horse of a Different Color, and 115 others in various areas of elementary math. 150 period line drawings.
 

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Contents

Plane Geometry Problems
1
Arithmetic and Algebraic Problems
2
Route Tracing and Topological Problems
7
The Plumbers Problem
16
The Hidden Star
17
The Man with the Hoe
21
The Old Beacon Tower
24
The Bridges of Kiinigsberg
26
The Yacht Race
64
The Battle of Hastings
65
Platos Cubes
68
The Patch Quilt Puzzle
73
Grandfathers Problem
78
The Quarrelsome Neighbors
79
Domestic Complications
94
Alice in Wonderland
107

The Football Problem
33
The Lake Puzzle
34
The Three Brides
36
The Battle of the Four Oaks
47
Multiplication and Addition
51
Going into Action 44
61
The Fighting Fishes of Siam
108
Counter and Sliding Block Problems
140
After Dinner Tricks 70
156
The Cheese Problem 111
163
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About the author (1959)

Martin Gardner was a renowned author who published over 70 books on subjects from science and math to poetry and religion. He also had a lifelong passion for magic tricks and puzzles. Well known for his mathematical games column in Scientific American and his "Trick of the Month" in Physics Teacher magazine, Gardner attracted a loyal following with his intelligence, wit, and imagination.

Martin Gardner: A Remembrance
The worldwide mathematical community was saddened by the death of Martin Gardner on May 22, 2010. Martin was 95 years old when he died, and had written 70 or 80 books during his long lifetime as an author. Martin's first Dover books were published in 1956 and 1957: Mathematics, Magic and Mystery, one of the first popular books on the intellectual excitement of mathematics to reach a wide audience, and Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science, certainly one of the first popular books to cast a devastatingly skeptical eye on the claims of pseudoscience and the many guises in which the modern world has given rise to it. Both of these pioneering books are still in print with Dover today along with more than a dozen other titles of Martin's books. They run the gamut from his elementary Codes, Ciphers and Secret Writing, which has been enjoyed by generations of younger readers since the 1980s, to the more demanding The New Ambidextrous Universe: Symmetry and Asymmetry from Mirror Reflections to Superstrings, which Dover published in its final revised form in 2005.

To those of us who have been associated with Dover for a long time, however, Martin was more than an author, albeit a remarkably popular and successful one. As a member of the small group of long-time advisors and consultants, which included NYU's Morris Kline in mathematics, Harvard's I. Bernard Cohen in the history of science, and MIT's J. P. Den Hartog in engineering, Martin's advice and editorial suggestions in the formative 1950s helped to define the Dover publishing program and give it the point of view which — despite many changes, new directions, and the consequences of evolution — continues to be operative today.

In the Author's Own Words:
"Politicians, real-estate agents, used-car salesmen, and advertising copy-writers are expected to stretch facts in self-serving directions, but scientists who falsify their results are regarded by their peers as committing an inexcusable crime. Yet the sad fact is that the history of science swarms with cases of outright fakery and instances of scientists who unconsciously distorted their work by seeing it through lenses of passionately held beliefs."

"A surprising proportion of mathematicians are accomplished musicians. Is it because music and mathematics share patterns that are beautiful?" — Martin Gardner

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