Mathematical Methods For Physics

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Westview Press, Nov 6, 2008 - Science - 256 pages
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This introduction to first-year graduate physics brings together mathematics and physics, using graphs and equations.
 

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Contents

The Partial Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics
1
Separation of Variables and Ordinary Differential Equations
28
Spherical Harmonics and Applications
74
Bessel Functions and Applications
122
Normal Mode Eigenvalue Problems
154
Spherical Bessel Functions and Applications
177
SUMMARY OF PART I
207
Greens Functions and Integral Equations
217
Integral Equations
335
PART III Complex Variable Techniques
381
Complex Variables Basic Theory
383
Evaluation of Integrals
448
Dispersion Relations
475
Special Functions
507
Integral Transforms in the Complex Plane
564
Bibliography
621

Dielectric and Magnetic Media
218
Chapter 8 Greens Functions
258
Index
625
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Page viii - Perseus Publishing's Frontiers in Physics series has, since 1961, made it possible for leading physicists to communicate in coherent fashion their views of recent developments in the most exciting and active fields of physics—- without having to devote the time and energy required to prepare a formal review or monograph. Indeed, throughout its nearly forty year existence, the series has emphasized informality in both style and content, as well as pedagogical clarity. Over time, it was expected...
Page viii - ... prepare a formal review or monograph. Indeed, throughout its nearly forty-year existence, the series has emphasized informality in both style and content, as well as pedagogical clarity. Over time, it was expected that these informal accounts would be replaced by more formal counterparts — textbooks or monographs — as the cutting-edge topics they treated gradually became integrated into the body of physics knowledge and reader interest dwindled. However, this has not proven to be the case...
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Page 59 - ... piecewise continuous function defined in the fundamental domain with a square-integrable1 first derivative may 1 We say that the derivative is square-integrable if the integral of the square of the derivative is bounded for all the intervals of the fundamental domain in which the function is continuous. be expanded in an eigenfunction series which converges absolutely and uniformly in...
Page 257 - Solutions of these equations together with the boundary conditions that the normal component of B and the tangential component of H are continuous at the sample boundary yield the magnetostatic modes.4 The uniform precession mode.
Page 164 - Since we imposed the condition that the ends of the string are fixed at x = 0 and x - L for all time t, the displacement...
Page 122 - E = -A .-, sin 2-5 Show that the electrostatic potential at any point is equal to the average of the potential over the surface of any sphere centered at that point for the case where the sphere contains no charge. 2-6 Show by direct integration that the electric field at an external point p due to a uniformly charged cylindrical shell carrying charge density A of radius R is given by...
Page 367 - I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics (Macmillan, New York, 1967), Vol. I, Chap. III. Jdxjdy [K(x,y)]2=||Kl|2...

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About the author (2008)

H. W. Wyld received his B.A. from Reed College and his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He taught for three years at Princeton University and is now an emeritus professor of physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and was recipient of a NSF Senior Postdoctoral Fellowship and of a Guggenheim Fellowship. He has authored or co-authored numerous publications on theoretical particle physics, plasma physics, turbulence, lattice field theory simulations, mesoscopic systems, wavelet theory, and maser radiation from astrophysical megadisks. H. W. Wyld received his B.A. from Reed College and his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He taught for three years at Princeton University and is now an emeritus professor of physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and was recipient of a NSF Senior Postdoctoral Fellowship and of a Guggenheim Fellowship. He has authored or co-authored numerous publications on theoretical particle physics, plasma physics, turbulence, lattice field theory simulations, mesoscopic systems, wavelet theory, and maser radiation from astrophysical megadisks.

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