Maurice Maeterlinck: A Study

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Duffield, 1911 - 336 pages
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Page 282 - But often, in the world's most crowded streets, But often, in the din of strife, There rises an unspeakable desire After the knowledge of our buried life, A thirst to spend our fire and restless force In tracking out our true, original course; A longing to inquire Into the mystery of this heart which beats So wild, so deep in us,— to know Whence our thoughts come and where they go.
Page 69 - If thou ask to what height man has carried it in this manner, look on our divinest Symbol : on Jesus of Nazareth, and his Life, and his Biography, and what followed therefrom. Higher has the human Thought not yet reached : this is Christianity and Christendom ; a Symbol of quite perennial, infinite character ; whose significance will ever demand to be anew inquired into, and anew made manifest.
Page 293 - A man is the facade of a temple wherein all wisdom and all good abide. What we commonly call man, the eating, drinking, planting, counting man, does not, as we know him, represent himself, but misrepresents himself. Him we do not respect, but the soul, whose organ he is, would he let it appear through his action, would make our knees bend.
Page 293 - When it breathes through his intellect, it is genius; when it breathes through his will, it is virtue ; when it flows through his affection, it is love.
Page 245 - Ah, James, how little you understand me, to talk of your confidence in my goodness and purity II would give them both to poor Eugene as willingly as I would give my shawl to a beggar dying of cold, if there were nothing else to restrain me.
Page 109 - I have grown to believe that he, motionless as he is, does yet live in reality a deeper, more human and more universal life than the lover who strangles his mistress, the captain who conquers in battle, or 'the husband...
Page 109 - I have grown to believe that an old man, seated in his armchair, waiting patiently, with his lamp beside him; giving unconscious ear to all the eternal laws that reign about his house, interpreting, without comprehending, the silence of doors and windows and the quivering voice of the light, submitting with bent head to the presence of his soul and his destiny...
Page 72 - Here is the difference betwixt the poet and the mystic, that the last nails a symbol to one sense, which was a true sense for a moment, but soon becomes old and false. For all symbols are fluxional; all language is vehicular and transitive, and is good, as ferries and horses are, for conveyance, not as farms and houses are, for homestead.
Page 89 - What we see upon a stage is body and bodily action ; what we are conscious of in reading is almost exclusively the mind and its movements ; and this, I think, may sufficiently account for the very different sort of delight with which the same play so often affects us in the reading and the seeing.
Page 119 - And there are no words so profound, so noble and admirable, but they will soon weary us if they leave the situation unchanged, if they lead to no action, bring about no decisive conflict, or hasten no definite solution.

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