Maxims and Hints on Angling, Chess, Shooting, and Other Matters: Also, Miseries of Fishing ; with Wood-cuts

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John Murray, 1842 - Chess - 106 pages
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Page 45 - I'll believe thee. Rom. If my heart's dear love Jul. Well, do not swear: although I joy in thee, I have no joy of this contract to-night : It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden ; Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be, Ere one can say — It lightens.
Page vii - You see the ways the fisherman doth take To catch the fish ; what engines doth he make ! Behold how he engageth all his wits ; Also his snares, lines, angles, hooks, and nets ; Yet fish there be, that neither hook nor line, Nor snare, nor net, nor engine can make thine : They must be groped for, and be tickled too, Or they will not be catch'd, whate'er you do.
Page 9 - The learned are much divided in opinion as to the propriety of whipping with two flies or with one. I am humbly of opinion that your chance of hooking fish is much increased by your using two flies; but I think that, by using only one, you increase your chance of landing the fish.
Page 16 - ... describing, as the scene of action, the spot which, in truth, you know to be still occupied by the other fish A. Your friend would then fish no more for A, supposing that to be the fish which you have caught ; and whilst he innocently resumes his operations below the bridge, .where he falsely imagines B still to be, A is left quietly for you, if you can catch him.
Page 18 - If you ask him what he thinks of the weather, he is very likely to say that last week (when you were in London) it was " famous weather for fishing;" or he will perhaps say that he expects that next week (when you are to be at home again) it will be very good. I never knew one of these men who was satisfied with the present hour. ' XXXIII. — Do not leave off fishing early in the evening because your your friends are tired.
Page 6 - XIII. Remember that, in whipping with the artificial fly, it must have time, when you have drawn it out of the water, to make the whole circuit, and to be at one time straight behind you, before it can be driven out straight before you. If you give it the forward impulse too soon, yo.u will hear a crack. Take this as a hint that your fly is gone to grass. • . XIV. Never throw with a long line when a short one will answer your purpose. The most difficult fish to hook is one which is rising at three-fourths...
Page 23 - Thompson now mended his tackle and went on fishing; and when he thought, " good easy man," that the very moment for hooking another trout was arrived, there was a great splash just above his fly; — and the boy exclaiming, " Damn 'un, I miss'd 'un," instantly threw a second brickbat at a rat \vhich was crossing the river.
Page 5 - A good fisherman will easily kill a trout of three pounds with a rod and line which are not strong enough to lift a dead weight of one pound from the floor, and place it on the table. XIII. Remember that, in whipping with the artificial fly, it must have time, when you have drawn it out of the water, to make the whole circuit, and to be at one time straight behind you, before it can be driven out straight before you. If you give it the forXI.
Page 7 - When you are drawing out your fly for a new throw. In all other cases it is necessary that, in order to hook him when he has taken the fly, you should do something with your wrist which it is not easy to describe.
Page 15 - If, during your walks by the river-side, you have marked any good fish, it is fair to presume that other persons have marked them also. Suppose the case of two well-known fish, one of them (which I will call A) lying above a certain bridge, the other (which I will call B) lying below the bridge. Suppose further that you have just caught B, and that som...

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