McFadden Language Series: Language and composition

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Rand McNally, 1915 - English language
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Page 149 - True, it seems a pleasant thing Nipping daisies in the spring; But what chilly nights I pass On the cold and dewy grass, Or pick my scanty dinner where All the ground is brown and bare. Then the farmer comes at last, When the merry Spring is past, Cuts my woolly fleece away For your coat in wintry day. Little master, this is why In the pleasant fields I lie.
Page 149 - Nay, my little master, nay, Do not serve me so, I pray : Don't you see the wool that grows On my back, to make you clothes ? Cold, and very cold, you'd be, If you had not wool from me.
Page 244 - Elephant took care of the master's little boy, and put him on his back and would not let anybody touch his master's little son. I can read three or four pages sometimes without missing a word. Ma says I may go to see you and stay all day with you next week if it be not rainy. She says I may ride my pony Hero if Uncle Ben will go with me and lead Hero. I have a little piece of poetry about the picture book you gave me, but I mustn't tell you who wrote the poetry.
Page 201 - WHEN I was sick and lay a-bed, I had two pillows at my head, And all my toys beside me lay To keep me happy all the day. And sometimes for an hour or so I watched my leaden soldiers go, With different uniforms and drills, Among the bed-clothes, through the hills; And sometimes sent my ships in fleets AH up and down among the sheets; Or brought my trees and houses out, And planted cities all about.
Page 148 - The Sheep. LAZY sheep, pray tell me why In the pleasant fields you lie, Eating grass and daisies white, From the morning till the night ? Every thing can something do, But what kind of use are you...
Page 244 - Dear Dickey, I thank you very much for the pretty picture book you gave me. Sam asked me to show him the pictures and I showed him all the pictures in it; and I read to him how the tame Elephant took care of the master's little boy, and put him on his back and would not let anybody touch his master's little son.
Page 201 - And sometimes for an hour or so I watched my leaden soldiers go, With different uniforms and drills, Among the bed-clothes, through the hills; And sometimes sent my ships in fleets All up and down among the sheets; Or brought my trees and houses out, And planted cities all about. I was the giant great and still That sits upon the pillow-hill, And sees before him, dale and plain, The pleasant land of counterpane.
Page 11 - begins with a capital letter because it is the name of a place. "August" begins with a capital because it is the name of a month.
Page 35 - WHEN father takes his spade to dig, Then Robin comes along. He sits upon a little twig, And sings a little song. Or, if the trees are rather far, He does not stay alone, But comes up close to where we are, And bobs upon a stone.
Page 22 - ... morning sun shone brightly. 2. The river ran swiftly to the sea. 3. The soldier rode gallantly down the street. Write the titles of a poem, a picture, and a story that you know. Give the rule for the use of capital letters in poetry. Name all the other rules for the use of capital letters that you know. Write the names of the days of the week. Write the names of the months in the order in which they come, and their abbreviations. Write the names of two persons whom you know, using the abbreviation...

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