Me the People: How Populism Transforms Democracy

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Harvard University Press, Aug 6, 2019 - Political Science - 240 pages
Populism suddenly is everywhere, and everywhere misunderstood. Nadia Urbinati argues that populism should be regarded as government based on an unmediated relationship between the leader and those defined as the “good” or “right” people. Mingling history, theory, and current affairs, Urbinati illuminates populism’s tense relation to democracy.
 

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Contents

A New Form of Representative Government
1
1 From Antiestablishment to Antipolitics
40
2 The True People and Its Majority
77
3 The Leader beyond Parties
113
4 Direct Representation
158
A Dead End?
190
Notes
211
Acknowledgments
257
Index
259
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About the author (2019)

Nadia Urbinati is the Kyriakos Tsakopoulos Professor of Political Theory in the Department of Political Science at Columbia University. She is the author of several books, including Democracy Disfigured: Opinion, Truth, and the People (Harvard); The Tyranny of the Moderns; Representative Democracy: Principles and Genealogy; and Mill on Democracy: From the Athenian Polis to Representative Government, which won the David and Elaine Spitz Prize for the best book in democratic theory.

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