Meals That Heal: A Nutraceutical Approach to Diet and Health

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Inner Traditions / Bear & Co, Sep 1, 1996 - Cooking - 235 pages
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Can a regular diet of tomatoes, soy products, and cruciferous vegetables help ward off cancer and heart disease? Can meals really heal? With increasing frequency scientific studies are responding with a resounding "yes." It has been general knowledge for years that vitamin C prevents scurvy and calcium helps build strong bones. But this pales in comparison to recent discoveries concerning phytonutrients and nutraceuticals. Garlic, for example, contains compounds that may reduce blood pressure and lower cholesterol levels. Broccoli contains substances that may help prevent cancer. Meals That Heal takes the latest scientific data on these substances out of the lab and puts it into the kitchen.

Presents a compilation of the most recent research on the proven benefits of various foods along with charts and graphs that relate this research to specific diseases.

More than 100 recipes for creating healthy and delicious meals include the healing properties of the foods and the benefits we can obtain from them.
 

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Meals that heal: a nutraceutical approach to diet and health

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The value of food as a weapon against disease is becoming increasingly recognized, as evidenced by the number of recent books on the subject (e.g., Eileen Behan's Cooking Well for the Unwell and ... Read full review

Contents

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Page 1 - FDA expert defined phytochemicals as "substances found in edible fruits and vegetables that may be ingested by humans daily in gram quantities, and that exhibit a potential for modulating human metabolism in a manner favorable for cancer prevention.

About the author (1996)

A Nutraceutical Approach to Diet and Health

Foreword
Preface
Introduction
Part One-The Function of Food
1. Coming to Terms with Nutraceuticals
2. The Changing of the Nutritional Guard
3. The Best Defense: Whole Foods Versus Supplements
4. Live Longer, Look Younger, Feel Better
5. The Dynamic Dozen: The Twelve Best Places to Find Your Phytos
6. The New Antioxidants and Novel Compounds
Part Two- Recipes
7. A Few Notes on Preparation
8. Tomatoes
9. Cruciferous Vegetables
10. Soybeans
11. Grains
12. Citrus Fruits
13. Greens
14. Red/Orange/Yellow Fruits
15. Red/Orange/Yellow Vegetables
16. Fish
17. Nuts and Seeds
18. Beans
19. Onions and Garlic
Appendix: Finding Your Phytos
Notes
Bibliography
Index

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