Measure and Music: Enjambement and Sentence Structure in the Iliad

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Clarendon Press, 1990 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 231 pages
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The foundation of this book is a line-by-line analysis of enjambement, or the syntactical relationship between successive verses, in the Iliad. Such a study develops naturally from Milman Parry's work, which sought to show the importance for oral composition, and specifically for Homer, bothof the syntactical link between lines and the frequency of each type of enjambement.In contrast to earlier studies, which utilized only portions of the text, Dr. Higbie's book is unique in presenting analyses of the complete poem. In doing so, she makes material available which can be used to answer larger stylistic questions of genre, effect, and the manipulation and enjambing offormulae. Speeches, similes, battle scenes, and catalogues, for example, can be distinguished by the length and structure of the sentences, as well as by the relationship between the individual sentence and the hexameter verse. Moreover, the flexibility and survival of the formula depend in partupon its grammatical construction. The importance of enjambement to Homeric verse makes this book an essential reference work for scholars and students of Homer alike.
 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
15
Section 3
66
Section 4
82
Section 5
85
Section 6
86
Section 7
90
Section 8
128
Section 9
131
Section 10
136
Section 11
138
Section 12
142
Section 13
143
Section 14
152
Section 15
219
Section 16
224

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About the author (1990)

Carolyn Higbie is at Southern Illinois University.

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