Measurement of Volume

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Royal Society of Chemistry, 2003 - Science - 22 pages
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This guide explains the best methods for undertaking the measurement of volume, one of the most frequent operations in the laboratory. It is required when obtaining a known quantity of a sample for analysis; for preparation of analytical reagents; and for preparation of calibration standards and quantitative analysis by titrimetry. After an initial section covering the units of volume and other terminology, the various types of volume measuring apparatus are then described. Later sections cover the importance of temperature, calibration, accuracy and use of the different types of apparatus, and the uncertainty of volume measurements. A series of practical exercises are also provided. Measurement of Volume is one of the Practical Laboratory Skills Training Guides, a series that aims to make achieving best practice easy. These invaluable manuals will enable both experienced and inexperienced staff to get the essential basics of any experiment right simply by following the clear and easy to use instructions provided. The guides are written by experienced scientists and include minimal theory, plenty of practical exercises in order to assess competence, and trouble shooting information. Other titles are: Measurement of Mass; Measurement of pH; High Performance Liquid Chromatography; and Gas Chromatography.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Use of Volumetric Apparatus Graduated Pipettes
15
Practical Exercises
21
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Elizabeth Prichard obtained a first degree in Chemistry from the University lege of Wales, Aberystwyth, where she went on to obtain her doctorate studying infrared spectroscopy. After a Civil Service Research Fellowship, she moved into academia, initially at Bedford College and then Royal Holloway and B Bedford New College, University of London before moving to the University of Warwick as a Senior Research Fellow. While at London University, she continued her research in spectroscopy, as well as some work in biophysical chemistry. At the University of Warwick, she researched the release profiles of steroids from implanted contraceptive devices. During her time at London University, Elizabeth spent sabbatical periods at the Division of Materials Application NPL, the Biophysics and Biochemistry Department, Wellcome research Foundation, Beckenham and then as Associate Professor sponsored by the British Council at the University of Gezira and at the University of Khartoum, Sudan.

Vicki Barwick obtained a first degree in Chemistry from the University of Nottingham. She then joined the Laboratory of the Government Chemist (which became LGC in 1996) as an analyst in the Consumer Safety Group. Vicki was involved with a number of projects to assess the safety of consumer products, including developing test methods for the identification of colorants in cosmetics and the quantitation of phthalate plasticizers in child-care items.

After five years as an analyst, Vicki moved within LGC to work on the DTI-funded Valid Analytical Measurement (VAM) programme. In this role, responsible for providing advice and developing guidance on methods validation, measurement uncertainty and statistics.One of her key project involved the chemical test methods. During this time, Vicki also became involved with the development and delivery of training courses on topics such as method validation, measurement uncertainty, quality systems and statistics for analytical chemists.

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