Mechanics Made Easy: How to Solve Mechanics Problems

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Trafford Publishing, 2004 - Science - 238 pages
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The fascinating subject of mechanics provides an insight and the inter-relationships between mass, time, distance, velocity, momentum, acceleration, force, energy and power. In turn this improves our understanding of the workings of our everyday world. An effective way to learn about mechanics is to solve mechanics problems. "Mechanics Made Easy (How To Solve Mechanics Problems)" is designed to supplement standard introductory-level school, college and university texts on this subject. The book consists of over 300 mechanics problems and step-bystep worked solutions in twelve topics: Velocity and Acceleration Relative Motion Projectiles Circular motion Collisions Laws of Motion Jointed Rods Equilibrium Motion of a Rigid Body Hydrostatics Differentiation and Integration Simple Harmonic Motion Over 500 clear, concise diagrams are provided to assist understanding of both problems and solutions. Working through these problems can help the reader improve problem-solving skills and gain the confi dence to tackle similar questions.
 

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Contents

9 9
v
Relative Motion
i
Projectiles
iv
Circular motion
vii
Collisions
xi
Laws ol Motion
7
Equilibrium
14
Motion of 0 Rigid Body
12
Hydrostatics
22
Differentiation and Integration
8
Simple Harmonic Motion
5
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

David Reynolds is a Chartered Engineer and holds a First Class Honours Degree (BAI) in Engineering, BA in Mathematics, and MBA, all from Trinity College in Dublin. In addition, he has recently passed his accountancy finals. His work as an engineer and manager has spanned diverse areas such as mechanical system design, electrical contracting, customer service, marketing, energy management, strategic planning and consultancy and project management. He has presented numerous technical/marketing papers to industrialists in Ireland and abroad. He has written numerous technical case histories and articles as well as a Good Practice Guide on Motive Power Applications. He currently lives in Ireland.

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