Media Ethics

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Psychology Press, 1998 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 195 pages
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Do journalists have a duty to be impartial and objective? How should the public's right-to-know be balanced against an individual's right to privacy? At a time when the role and responsibilities of the media have become an increasingly important part of public debate, this text brings together philosophers, media academics and journalists to discuss the pressing ethical and moral questions faced by the media and to examine the basic notions such as truth, virtue, privacy, rights, offence, harm and freedom which underlie them. The book engages with debates about privacy and media intrusion, the ethics of political journalism, and the justification of censorship against the demands of freedom of expression.
 

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Contents

The journalism of attachment
15
The problem of humbug
37
new militarism and
66
Privacy the public interest and a prurient public
82
the legal and extralegal protection
97
market moguls and media regulation
111
Is the medium a moral message?
135
Sex and violence in fact and fiction
152
Censorship and the media
165
Select bibliography
179
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About the author (1998)

MATTHEW KIERAN is Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Leeds, England.

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