Media/Society: Industries, Images, and Audiences

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Pine Forge Press, 2003 - Performing Arts - 409 pages
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This book gives students an overview of the entire media process - from production to content to audiences - with an emphasis on how social forces influence the media and how media potentially affect society. A key emphasis throughout the work is how various elements in the media process interact with each other. This Third Edition of Media/Society provides students with conceptual tools for understanding the role of media in contemporary society - where mass media images come from, how and why they matter, and the kinds of questions and dilemmas that mass media raise about social life. 

 

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Contents

Media and the Social World
3
The Importance of Media
4
The Rise of Mass Media
6
The Print Medium
9
Sound Recording and the Film Medium
11
New Media
12
Media and Society
13
Mass Media in Social Relations
15
Racial Diversity in Media Content
202
Race and Media Roles
204
Controlling Media Images of Race
210
Gender and Media Content
212
Changing Media Roles for Women and Men
213
Class and the Media
216
Class and Media Content
217
Out of the Closet and Into the Media?
224

A Sociology of Media
16
The Importance of Social Relations
18
Structural Constraint and Human Agency
20
Structure and Agency in the Media
22
A Model of Media and the Social World
25
Applying the ModehThe Civil Rights Movement
27
Conclusion
30
Production The Media Industry and the Social World
31
The Economics of the Media Industry
33
Changing Patterns of Ownership
34
Conglomeration and Integration
40
Consequences of Conglomeration and Integration
44
The Impact of Conglomeration
46
The Effects of Concentration
47
Media Ownership and Content Diversity
51
Mass Media for Profit
58
Profit and the News Media
62
The Impact of Advertising
63
Advertising and the Press in the Nineteenth Century
67
Advertising and the Contemporary News Media
70
Advertising MTV and New Media
73
Conclusion
76
Political Influence on Media
77
The Case of Pirate Radio
78
Common Features of Media Regulation Debates
80
The First Freedom
83
The Public Interest and the Regulation Debate
85
Regulation in International Perspective
87
Regulating Ownership and Control
89
The Case of FinSyn Rules
92
Regulating Ownership and Control of Technology
95
Regulating Media Content and Distribution
98
The Fairness Doctrine
99
Regulating for Morality
101
Advertising
112
Media and the Military
113
Informal Political Social and Economic Pressure
116
Conclusion
119
Media Organizations and Professionals
121
The Limits of Economic and Political Constraints
122
Responding to Political Constraints
123
The Organization of Media Work
124
News Routines
126
Selecting FrontPage Stories
129
Objectivity
131
Occupational Roles and Professional Socialization
135
Photography
137
Editorial Decision Making
143
Norms on the Internet
149
Hits Stars and Decision Making
153
Conclusion
156
Content Media Representations of the Social World
157
Media and Ideology
159
Dominant Ideology Versus Cultural Contradictions
161
Ideology as Normalization
163
Theoretical Roots of Ideological Analysis
164
Hegemony
165
News Media and the Limits of Debate
169
Economic News as Ideological Construct
171
Movies the Military and Masculinity
172
ActionAdventure Films
174
Vietnam Films
175
Television Popularity and Ideology
176
Television and Reality
178
Television and the Changing American Family
179
Rap Music as Ideological Critique?
181
Advertising and Consumer Culture
184
Selling Consumerism in the Early Twentieth Century
186
Womens Magazines as Advertisements
188
Advertising and the Globalization of Culture
189
Conclusion
192
Social Inequality and Media Representation
195
Comparing Media Content and the Real World
196
The Significance of Content
198
Inclusion Roles and Control
200
Conclusion
227
Meaning and Influence
229
Media Influence and the Political World
231
Media and Political Elites
232
A Politics of Image
233
The Decline of Political Parties and Mediating Institutions
237
Politics as Spectator Sport
238
Media and Individual Citizens
240
The Gap Between Theory and Popular Perception
244
Lessons From the Research
246
Media and Social Movements
247
New Media and the News
249
Politics and Entertainment Media
253
Music
256
Global Media Global Politics
259
The Cultural Imperialism Thesis
260
The Politics of Media in Other Nations
262
Conclusion
264
Active Audiences and the Construction of Meaning
265
The Active Audience
266
Interpretation
267
The Social Context of Interpretation
268
Agency and Structure
269
Structure and Interpretive Constraint
273
Decoding Media and Social Position
274
Gender Class and Television
278
Race News and Meaning Making
279
International Readings of American Television
281
The Social Context of Media Use
284
Watching Television With the Family
287
Active Audiences and Interpretive Resistance
289
Interpretive Resistance and Feminist Politics
290
Resistance and Identity
292
The Pleasures of Media
293
Pleasure and Fantasy
294
Celebrity Games
295
Pleasure and Resistance
297
Conclusion
298
Media Technology and Social Change
299
The Nature and Consequence of Media Technology
300
Mediating Communication
302
Rethinking Time and Space
304
Technological Determinism
305
Technology and the Media Environment
307
Images and Public Life
308
Electronic Media and Social Identity
311
Medium Theory in a Computer Age
312
The Social Construction of Media Technologies
314
The Early Years of Radio
315
Introducing Television Into the Home
319
The Internet and the Future of Interactive Media
321
Corporate Efforts to Control the Internet
326
Beyond Technological Determinism
330
Conclusion
332
Globalization and the Future
335
Media in a Changing Global Culture
337
What Is Globalization?
338
Crossing Cultural Boundaries
340
The Promise and Reality of Media Globalization
342
The Global Media Industry
343
Global Products Centralized Ownership
344
The Case of Bertelsmann
348
Global Media Content
355
The Fight to Preserve Local Cultures
356
Some Complications
359
The Politics of Information Flow
363
Limits of the Global Village
366
The Ubiquity of Change and the Future of Mass Media
369
Selected MediaRelated Internet Resources
373
Media Education
374
Media Research Policy and Publications
375
Media Advocacy
376
REFERENCES
379
INDEX
397
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

David Croteau taught about the sociology of media as an Associate Professor (retired) in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is the author of Politics and the Class Divide: Working People and the Middle-Class Left and co-author, with William Hoynes, of Experience Sociology.

William Hoynes is Professor of Sociology and former Director of the Media Studies Program at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York, where he teaches courses on media, culture, and social theory. He is the author of Public Television for Sale: Media, the Market, and the Public Sphere and co-author, with David Croteau, of Experience Sociology.

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