Medical Interpreting and Cross-cultural Communication

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 21, 2004 - Language Arts & Disciplines
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When healthcare providers and patients do not speak the same language, medical interpreters are called in to help. In this book - the first ever ethnographic study of a bilingual hospital - Claudia Angelelli explores the role of medical interpreters, drawing on data from over 300 medical encounters and interviewing the interpreters themselves about the people for whom they interpret, their challenges, and how they characterize their role. Traditionally the interpreter has been viewed as a language conduit, with little power over the medical encounter or the relationship between patient and provider. This book presents an alternative view, considering the interpreter's agency and contextualizing the practice within an institution that is part of a larger society. Bringing together literature from social theory, social psychology and linguistic anthropology, this book will be welcomed by anyone who wants to discover the intricacies of medical interpreting firsthand; particularly researchers, communication specialists, policy makers and practitioners.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
xi
Abbreviations
xiii
Prologue
1
1 Questioning invisibility
7
2 Communication in the medical encounter
15
3 A different set of lenses
26
a public hospital in changing times
44
5 Putting it all together
58
6 Finding visibility
73
7 Interpreters voices
105
8 Emerging metaphors and final words
129
References
142
Index
147
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About the author (2004)

Claudia V. Angelelli is Assistant Professor of Spanish Linguistics at San Diego State University.

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