Medical Report of the Society of the Lying-in Hospital of the City of New York ...

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Page 121 - When we pass into the second section of the patristic period (from the beginning of the fourth to the end of the sixth century), we find that although the doctrine of endless punishment still prevails, there is more dissent from it.
Page 231 - ... Maylard, and quote his conclusions : "The practical lessons, then, which these various experiments seem to teach are that sponges, which are most open in their meshwork, are least likely to be septic from causes connected with their preparation ; that these same sponges are easiest to sterilize, and that a solution of bichloride of Mercury of a strength of 1 to 2000 is the best sterilizing medium. It follows from the above that large sponges, and thick, dense sponges, are those most likely to...
Page 63 - ... instructor regarding their findings in the case. Should operation or interference be called for it is to be performed by the instructor, but should the case prove a normal one, the student may be permitted to complete the case, always under the criticism and supervision of the instructor, who should be expected to address not only the students at the case, but the entire audience. Many points of practical interest, connected with the management of the second and third stages of labor, the handling...
Page 186 - I believe that the latter is less dangerous than the abortion and its sequelae in cases of retention, and curettage makes sure that everything is removed; involution and time are necessary for convalescence after abortion; the one is hastened, the other cut short, after curetting; this is of course a boon to the working classes. The expectant plan requires two weeks for itself alone; after instrumentation the patient may leave her bed on the fifth day, pain and physical discomfort, as well as mental...
Page 217 - Pain," by JL Coffiin, MD, West Medford ; "The Treatment of Puerperal Convulsions," by SB Dickerman, MD, Abington ; "The Third Stage of Labor," by Sarah E. Sherman, MD, Salem ; " The Treatment of Abortion at the Fourth or Fifth Month, with retained Placenta," by GR Southwick, MD, Boston. The Committee on the President's Address recommended that the subject of the address be referred to the Committee on Legislation.
Page 269 - Societies. we have immediately the means of rectification, and usually the rectification should be at the superior strait. Of course in neglected cases it is different. Rectification, however, by flexion, is not always the best means for this reason, that there generally is a disproportion between the size of the head and the size of the pelvis. So that we should consider, when we have our hand there, whether it would not be better to proceed to version, so as to give the child the chance of the...
Page 310 - Kaltenbach have advanced the theory that the chorionic villi develop in the decidua reflexa as well as in the serotina, and the reflexa subsequently becomes attached to the vera, forming a part of the placenta. If this process takes place in the lower pole of the ovum, the cervix is liable to be more or less covered.
Page 62 - ... examine the case, make their diagnosis of pregnancy or labor, presentation, condition of the os, membranes, vagina, vulva, bladder, rectum and hard parts, and finally undergo questioning from the instructor regarding their findings in the case. Should operation or interference be called for it is to be performed by the instructor, but should the case prove a normal one, the student may be permitted to complete the case, always under the criticism and supervision of the instructor, who should...
Page 312 - When the cervix is dilated, the diagnosis presents no difficulty, except in some cases of marginal implantation, in which the edge of the placenta becomes detached from the lower zone and remains suspended in the cervix, surrounded by blood clots.
Page 305 - ... meets all the requirements of immobilization. If not applied with care, this may impede respiration. A towel folded over the chest and removed after the plaster is hard, prevents that danger. This dressing may cause erythema, desquamation, and even erysipelatous-looking eruptions, which render the patients exceedingly uncomfortable.

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