Medicinal Chemistry: A Molecular and Biochemical Approach

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Oxford University Press, USA, Aug 11, 2005 - Medical - 649 pages
Fully updated and rewritten by a basic scientist who is also a practicing physician, the third edition of this popular textbook remains comprehensive, authoritative and readable. Taking a receptor-based, target-centered approach, it presents the concepts central to the study of drug action in a logical, mechanistic way grounded on molecular and principles. Students of pharmacy, chemistry and pharmacology, as well as researchers interested in a better understanding of drug design, will find this book an invaluable resource.Starting with an overview of basic principles, Medicinal Chemistry examines the properties of drug molecules, the characteristics of drug receptors, and the nature of drug-receptor interactions. Then it systematically examines the various families of receptors involved in human disease and drug design. The first three classes of receptors are related to endogenous molecules: neurotransmitters, hormones and immunomodulators. Next, receptors associated with cellular organelles (mitochondria, cell nucleus), endogenous macromolecules (membrane proteins, cytoplasmic enzymes) and pathogens (viruses, bacteria) are examined. Through this evaluation of receptors, all the main types of human disease and all major categories of drugs are considered.There have been many changes in the third edition, including a new chapter on the immune system. Because of their increasingly prominent role in drug discovery, molecular modeling techniques, high throughput screening, neuropharmacology and genetics/genomics are given much more attention. The chapter on hormonal therapies has been thoroughly updated and re-organized. Emerging enzyme targets in drug design (e.g. kinases, caspases) are discussed, and recent information on voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channels has been incorporated. The sections on antihypertensive, antiviral, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antiarrhythmic, and anticancer drugs, as well as treatments for hyperlipidemia and peptic ulcer, have been substantially expanded. One new feature will enhance the book's appeal to all readers: clinical-molecular interface sections that facilitate understanding of the treatment of human disease at a molecular level.
 

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Contents

VI
9
VII
24
VIII
32
IX
36
X
40
XI
43
XII
63
XIII
67
LX
321
LXI
325
LXII
328
LXIII
332
LXV
337
LXVI
338
LXVIII
346
LXIX
348

XIV
68
XV
69
XVI
75
XVII
78
XVIII
81
XIX
84
XX
90
XXI
92
XXII
93
XXIII
96
XXIV
101
XXV
103
XXVI
106
XXVII
108
XXVIII
128
XXIX
134
XXX
146
XXXI
159
XXXII
163
XXXIII
166
XXXIV
183
XXXV
185
XXXVI
186
XXXVIII
188
XXXIX
193
XL
204
XLI
218
XLII
238
XLIII
249
XLIV
260
XLV
270
XLVI
281
XLVII
283
XLVIII
288
XLIX
291
L
296
LI
297
LII
299
LIII
310
LIV
312
LVI
314
LVII
315
LVIII
316
LIX
320
LXX
350
LXXI
359
LXXII
364
LXXIII
371
LXXIV
376
LXXV
378
LXXVI
381
LXXVII
382
LXXVIII
386
LXXIX
392
LXXX
398
LXXXI
403
LXXXII
405
LXXXIII
406
LXXXIV
409
LXXXV
412
LXXXVI
413
LXXXVII
432
LXXXVIII
433
LXXXIX
439
XC
441
XCI
463
XCII
465
XCIII
483
XCIV
513
XCV
517
XCVI
519
XCVII
528
XCVIII
529
XCIX
532
C
538
CI
543
CII
546
CIII
547
CIV
559
CV
581
CVI
584
CVII
591
CVIII
592
CIX
593
CX
596
CXI
601
CXII
629
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About the author (2005)

Thomas Nogrady is at Concordia University (Emeritus). Donald F. Weaver is at Dalhousie University.

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