Ethnopharmacology of Medicinal Plants: Asia and the Pacific

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Nov 4, 2007 - Medical - 228 pages
In 1860, Oliver Wendell Holmes pointedly expressed himself to the Massachusetts Medical Society: “I firmly believe that if the whole Material Medica, as now used, could be sunk to the bottom of the sea, it would be all the better for mankind, and all the worst for the fishes.” Should one think the same about the current approach in drug discovery from plants? Probably yes. Despite the spending of billions of US dollars, and three decades of efforts, high-throughput screenings have only allowed the discovery of a couple of drugs. One could have reasonably expected the discovery of an arsenal of drugs from the millions of plant extracts randomly tested, but “hits” can be inactive in vitro or too toxic, some molecules need to be metabolized first to be active, and false-positive and false-negative results are common. The bitter truth is that the robotic approach in discovering drugs from plants has proven, to date, its inability to excavate the hundreds of molecules that will contribute to the health progress of Man. However, one can reasonably see that the last patches of primary rainforest on earth hold still hundreds of spectacularly active drugs that await discovery.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

ANTIINFLAMMATORY PLANTS
1
Medicinal Myristicaceae
8
Inhibitors of COX
15
Medicinal Asteraceae
21
Inhibitors of Lipoxygenases
27
Inhibitors of Nitric Oxide Synthetase
38
Medicinal Solanaceae
45
PLANTS AFFECTING THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM
57
Medicinal Lamiaceae 24
94
Medicinal Rutaceae
174
Alchornea villosa Benth Muell
180
Medicinal Hamamelidaceae
186
Apoptosis
194
Summary and Future Prospects
208
Ocimum basilicum L
220
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information