Medicine and Society in Early Modern Europe

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 1, 2010 - History - 300 pages
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Medicine and Society in Early Modern Europe offers students a concise introduction to health and healing in Europe from 1500 to 1800. Bringing together the best recent research in the field, Mary Lindemann examines medicine from a social and cultural perspective, rather than a narrowly scientific one. Drawing on medical anthropology, sociology, and ethics as well as cultural and social history, she focuses on the experience of illness and on patients and folk healers as much as on the rise of medical science, doctors, and hospitals. This second edition has been updated and revised throughout in content, style, and interpretations and new material has been added, in particular, on colonialism, exploration, and women. Accessibly written and full of fascinating insights, this will be essential reading for all students of the history of medicine and will provide invaluable context for students of early modern Europe more generally.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Sickness and health
11
2 Plagues and peoples
50
3 Learned medicine
84
4 Learning to heal
121
5 Hospitals and asylums
157
6 Health and society
193
7 Healing
235
Conclusion
281
Further reading
284
Index
294
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About the author (2010)

Mary Lindemann is Professor of History at the University of Miami. Her publications include Health and Healing in Early Modern Germany (1996) which was awarded the 1998 William Welch Book Medal Prize by the American Association for the History of Medicine.

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