Medico-Chirurgical Transactions, Volume 10

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Page 29 - ... Contemporary with the last symptoms, or very soon afterwards, ulcers appear at the inside of the joints of the toes and fingers, directly under the last joint of the metatarsal or metacarpal bones, or they corrode the thick sole under the joint of the os calcis, or os cuboides. There is no previous tumour, suppuration, or pain, but apparently a simple absorption of the integuments, which slough off in successive layers of half an inch in diameter. A sanious discharge comes on ; the muscle pale...
Page 29 - ... and a spectacle of horror to all besides, still cherishes fondly the spark of life remaining, and eats voraciously all he can procure : he will often crawl about with little but his trunk remaining, until old age comes on ; and at last he is carried off by diarrhoea or dysentery, which the enfeebled constitution has no stamina to resist.
Page 162 - ... the ball. At the commencement the external appearance of the eye is little affected, except that there is a slight degree of redness and a discharge of tears. This state gradually increases, until the sensation becomes converted into what may be characterized as a combination of the most acute itching and smarting, accompanied with a feeling of small points striking upon or darting into the ball, at the same time that the eyes become extremely inflamed, and discharge very copiously a thick mucous...
Page 316 - There is, perhaps, no disease over which medical art has less power, and this power, such as it is, has consisted more in abolishing pernicious practices than in ascertaining any positive methods of controuling its fatality, unless we except the inoculation of it with its own virus. But, though the beneficial effect of this on those on whom it is actually practised is undeniable, it has. no tendency like Vaccination to extirpate the disease; and from the impossibility of rendering it universal, it...
Page 32 - The great and rapid determination it causes to the skin has an obvious tendency to increase such diseases. I have tried it freely in lues venerea, but cannot venture to recommend it as a substitute for mercury. It will enable you to heal a chancre, but does not eradicate the poison. In the secondary symptoms, however, it is an admirable ally, superseding, by its certain efficacy, the exhibition of mezereon, sarsaparilla, and other vegetables of doubtful utility. Where mercury has been used, but cannot...
Page 324 - Report, 3d January, 1808, that the Small Pox had entirely disappeared in all the large towns in that country; and that in the great city of Milan it had not appeared for several years. Dr. Odier, of Geneva, so favourably known for his high professional, scientific, and literary acquirements, testifies, that, after a vigorous perseverance in Vaccination for six years, the Small Pox had disappeared in that city and the whole surrounding district; and that, when casually introduced by strangers, it...
Page 322 - Vaccination which has taken place in this metropolis, 23,134 lives have been saved, in the last fifteen years, according to the best computation that the data afford.
Page 240 - Thss four-fe/ths of the air in the still rush into the sphere; and the stop-cock being shut again, a second exhaustion is effected by steam in the same manner as the first was ; after which a momentary communication is again allowed between the iron still and the receiver : by this means four-fifths of the air remaining after the former exhaustion is expelled.
Page 136 - Brande has, remarked*, to be the precipitating upon it a coating of the earthy phosphates from the urine, a sort of concretion which, as has been. / observed by various practical writers, increases much more rapidly than that consisting of uric acid only. The same unfavourable inference may be drawn also from the dissections of those persons, in whom a stone has been supposed...
Page 41 - The proximate cause of caries appears to be an inflammation in the bone of the crown of the tooth, which, on account of its peculiar structure, terminates in mortification.

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