Medieval and Renaissance Letter Treatises and Form Letters: A Census of Manuscripts Found in Part of Western Europe, Japan, and the United States of America

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BRILL, 1994 - Literary Criticism - 474 pages
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In the High Middle Ages and Renaissance letter-writing flourished as a major form of discourse and branch of rhetoric. Hundreds of treatises and manuals on epistolary composition, formularies and model letter collections were written. This census is the first systematic survey of the extant manuscripts containing these works found in part of Western Europe, Japan, and the USA. The few manuscripts with model speeches are also included. They are of a related genre, secular oratory, which developed in the High Middle Ages. Over 1,200 Latin manuscript references have been compiled from visits to over 250 libraries and archives.
The survey is alphabetically arranged by country, city, library or archive and collection and gives standard details - folios, incipits, explicits, and colophons of the texts. Editions, studies, and catalogue references are provided as are lists of libraries and archives without relevant manuscripts. Four indexes of manuscripts, incipits, Medieval and Renaissance authors, and select anonymous works are included. The work is a research tool for those interested in Medieval and Renaissance rhetoric, oratory, diplomatics, learning, and the Classical tradition.
 

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
5
Section 3
41
Section 4
55
Section 5
59
Section 6
61
Section 7
75
Section 8
79
Section 14
105
Section 15
173
Section 16
175
Section 17
191
Section 18
193
Section 19
255
Section 20
403
Section 21
407

Section 9
81
Section 10
93
Section 11
97
Section 12
99
Section 13
103
Section 22
409
Section 23
417
Section 24
433
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About the author (1994)

Emil Polak, Ph.D. in Medieval History, Columbia University and a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome, is Professor of History at Queensborough Community College of the City University of New York. His publications include "A Textual Study of Jacques de Dinant's" Summa dictaminis (Geneva, 1975), and "Medieval and Renaissance Letter Treatises and Form Letters. A Census of Manuscripts found in Eastern Europe and the Former U.S.S.R." (Brill, 1993).

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