Meeting the Challenges of Change in Postgraduate Education

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Trevor Kerry
A&C Black, Aug 26, 2010 - Education - 208 pages
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This text takes a radical look at the nature of adult learning in the postgraduate context and at the implications of this for universities and their courses. While, over recent decades, schools have had to undergo major re-assessments about how learning is developed into curriculum, how learning is delivered to students, and how that learning is assessed, universities have remained very largely detached from these pedagogical/andragogical issues. However, the circumstances of higher education provision have changed. There is also real pressure now from vocationalism.

Meeting the Challenges of Change in Postgraduate Education places these movements in both a UK and a wider context examines the nature of learning and teaching in postgraduate education and opens up the debate for rethinking university provision. The book examines concepts such as integration as ways of retaining the higher order skills of a university education over against narrower, technicist approaches and suggest a continuum of provision, but one in which the learner takes centre stage.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
FIRST ENCOUNTERS WITH POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION THE CONCEPT OF THE COURSE
9
POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION PRINCIPLES AND PHILOSOPHY
71
POSTGRADUATE EXPERIENCE THE STUDENT PERSPECTIVE
141
Postscript
189
Index
193
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Trevor Kerry is Visiting Professor at Bishop Grosseteste University College, UK. Until recently he was Professor of Education Leadership at the Centre for Educational Research and Development at Lincoln University, UK, and is the university's first Emeritus Professor. He has worked in primary, secondary, further and higher education, as well as teacher education. He has been a Senior General Advisor with a Local Authority and an Ofsted Inspector. He was Professor of Education at the College of Teachers (UK), where he was also Senior Vice-President and Journal Editor.

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