Melincourt, Volume 2

Front Cover
Moses Thomas, William Fry, Printer, 1817 - 232 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 95 - CONDITIONS OF SALE. I. The highest bidder to be the buyer; and if any dispute arise between bidders, the lot so disputed shall be immediately put up again, provided the auctioneer cannot decide the said dispute.
Page 186 - Echo is a mere voice, rests not in her unaccomplishment, until by secret inclination she accorporate herself with Error, who being a blind and serpentine body...
Page 41 - Tis said the rose is Love's own flower, Its blush so bright, its thorns so many; And winter on its bloom has power, But has not on its sweetness any. For though young Love's ethereal rose Will droop on Age's wintry bosom, Yet still its faded leaves disclose The fragrance of their earliest blossom. But ah ! the fragrance lingering there Is like the sweets that mournful duty Bestows with sadly-soothing care, To deck the grave of bloom and beauty. For when its leaves are shrunk and dry, Its blush extinct,...
Page 16 - When I open the bottle, I shut the book of Numbers. There are two reasons for drinking : one is, / when you are thirsty, to cure it ; the other, when you are not thirsty, to prevent it.
Page 185 - Assembly, who of all teachers and masters that have ever taught, hath drawn the most disciples after him, both in religion and in manners, it might be not untruly answered, Custom. Though virtue be commended for the most persuasive in her theory, and conscience in the plain demonstration of the spirit finds most evincing ; yet whether it be the secret of divine will or the original blindness we are born in, so it happens for the most part that Custom still is silently received for the best instructor.
Page 42 - The fragrance of their earliest blossom. But ah ! the fragrance lingering there Is like the sweets that mournful duty Bestows with sadly-soothing care, To deck the grave of bloom and beauty. For when its leaves are shrunk and dry, Its blush extinct, to kindle never, That fragrance is but Memory's sigh, That breathes of pleasures past for ever. Why did not Love the amaranth choose, That bears no thorns, and cannot perish? Alas ! no sweets its flowers diffuse, And only sweets Love's life can cherish....
Page 148 - I have seen such a man walk with a demure face into church, as regularly as if the Sunday bell had been a portion of his corporeal mechanism, to hear a bloated and beneficed sensualist hold forth on the text of Do as ye would be done by, or...
Page 44 - ... lady fair ! to my constant prayer Fate proves at last propitious : And bags of gold in my hand I bear, And parchment scrolls delicious. THE LADY. My maid the door shall open throw, For we too long have tarried : The friar keeps watch in the cellar below, And we will at once be married. THE FRIAR. My children ! great is Fortune's power ; And plain this truth appears, That gold thrives more in a single hour, Than love in seven long years.
Page 28 - What makes all doctrines plain and clear ? About two hundred pounds a year. — And that which was proved true before, Prove false again ? — Two hundred more.
Page 93 - Sarcastic.— This then is my system. I ascertain the practice of those I talk to, and present it to them as from myself, in the shape of theory: the consequence of which is, that I am universally stigmatized as a promulgator of rascally doctrines.

Bibliographic information