Memoir on the Island of Navassa (West Indies)

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J.B. Rose & Company, 1866 - Navassa Island - 32 pages
 

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Page 11 - ... furrowings by the waters dripping down its front, and the consequent formation of stalagmitic incrustations. Deep caverns were also seen. The cliff, though vertical in some parts, is roughly sloping in others, and on the west side, the surface of the island gradually declines to the sea. The rock is a white and solid limestone, seldom presenting any traces of its coral origin.
Page 13 - ... shores of this semi-continent, where it is continued for scores of miles. At the base of the sandstone cliff, in most places one or more hundred feet in height, there is a layer of sandstone rock, lying, like the shore platform of the coral island, near low tide level, and from fifty to one hundred and fifty yards in width. It is continuous with the bottom layer of the cliff: the rocks which once covered it, have been removed by the sea. Its outer edge is the surf-line of the shore. At low tide...
Page 12 - It will be remembered that it lies but little above low tide level, and is often three hundred feet in width, with a nearly flat surface throughout. Though apparently so peculiar, the existence of this platform is due to the simple action of the sea, and is a necessary result of this action. Passing to New Holland, from the coral islands of the tropics, we there found the same structure exemplified along the sandstone shores of this semi-continent, where it is continued for scores of miles. At the...
Page 12 - ... necessary result of this action. Passing to New Holland, from the coral islands of the tropics, we there found the same structure exemplified along the sandstone shores of this semi-continent, where it is continued for scores of miles. At the base of the sandstone cliff, in most places one or more hundred feet in height, there is a layer of sandstone rock, lying, like the shore platform of the coral island, near low tide level, and from fifty to one hundred and fifty yards in width. It is continuous...
Page 11 - ... needles and ridges of rock as high as the head, the peaks and narrow defiles forming a miniature model of the grandest Alpine scenery. There is but little soil, yet the island is covered with trees and shrubbery. The shores, at the first elevation of the island, must have been worn away to a large extent by the sea ; and the cliff and some isolated pinnacles of coral rock still standing on the coast are evidence of the degradation. But at present there is a wide shore platform of coral reef,...
Page 11 - ... first elevation of the island, must have been worn away to a large extent by the sea ; and the cliff and some isolated pinnacles of coral rock still standing on the coast are evidence of the degradation. But at present there is a wide shore platform of coral reef, two hundred or two hundred and fifty feet wide, resembling that of the low coral islands, and having growing coral as usual about its margin and in the shallow depths beyond. In the face of the cliff there are two horizontal lines,...
Page 15 - Taputeouea, whose whole habitable area does not exceed six square miles.* Water is to be found commonly in sufficient quantities for the use of the natives, although the land is so low and flat. They dig wells five to ten feet deep in any part of the dry islets, and generally obtain a constant supply. These wells are sometimes fenced around with special care ; and the houses of the villagers, as at Fakaafo, are often clustered about them.
Page 12 - ... the waters dripping down its front, and the consequent formation of stalagmitic incrustations. Deep caverns were also seen. The cliff, though vertical in some parts, is roughly sloping in others, and on the west side, the surface of the island gradually declines to the sea. The rock was found to be a white and solid limestone, seldom presenting any traces of its coral origin.
Page 15 - Fakaafo, are often clustered about them. On Aratica (Carlshoff) there is a watering place 50 feet in diameter, from which our vessels in a few hours obtained 390 gallons. The Tarawan Islands are generally provided with a supply sufficient for bathing, and each native takes his morning bath in fresh water, which is esteemed by them a great luxury. On Taritari, as Mr. Hale was informed by a Scotch sailor taken from the island, by the name of Gray, there is a long trench or canal, described by him as...
Page 15 - in the inner part of Otdia (one of the Marshall Islands) there is a lake of sweet water ; and in Tabual, of the Group Aur, a marshy ground exists. There is no want of fresh water in the larger islands ; it rises in abundance in the pits dug for the purpose.

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