Memoirs and Reflections Upon the Reign and Government of King Charles the Ist. and King Charles the IId: Containing an Account of Several Remarkable Facts Not Mentioned by Historians of Those Times, Wherein the Character of the Royal Martyr, and of King Charles II are Vindicated from Fanatical Aspersions

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N. Mist, 1721 - Great Britain - 439 pages
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Page 37 - ... when the good and safety of the kingdom in general is concerned, and the whole kingdom in danger...
Page 425 - I am weary of travelling, I am resolved to go abroad no more : but when I am dead and gone, I know not what my brother will do. I am much afraid, that when he comes to the crown, he will be obliged to travel again.
Page 126 - And so the army was engaged before the cannon was turned, or the ground made choice of upon which they were to fight; so that courage was only to be relied upon where all conduct failed so much.
Page 197 - ever been against the parliament during the time " of the civil war, or the sons of any such persons, " should be capable of being chosen to sit in that " parliament;" nor were any such persons made choice of.
Page 425 - I am resolved to go abroad no more : but when I am dead and gone, I know not what my brother will do. I am much afraid, that when he comes to the crown, he will be obliged to travel again. And yet I will take care to leave my kingdoms to him in peace, wishing he may long keep them so. But this hath all of my fears, little of my hopes, and less of my reason; and I am much afraid, that when my brother comes to the crown, he will be obliged again to leave his native soil.
Page 178 - England, and therein trusted with a limited power to govern by and according to the laws of the land, and not otherwise ; and by his trust, oath, and office, being obliged to use the power committed to him for the good and benefit of the people, and for the preservation of their rights and liberties...
Page 32 - ... remarkable faults : besides, in these cases, his Majesty discharges the hardship and severity of all punishments upon the Parliament, and commits no force upon the gentleness of his own nature, while his subjects see that no tenderness of their prince, nor corruption of ministers, can preserve them long from paying what they owe to any forfeits of their duty.
Page 129 - Sir Richard Willis appeared very much troubled; and excused the not taking the other command, " as a place of too great honour, and that his fortune could not maintain him in that employment:" he said, " that his .enemies would triumph at his removal, and he should be looked upon as cast out and disgraced.
Page 81 - Prince Rupert passed from one wing to the other, giving positive orders to the horse to march as close as possible, keeping their ranks with sword in hand to receive the enemy's shot, without firing either carbine or pistol till we broke in amongst the enemy and then to make use of our fire-arms as need should require, which order was punctually observed.

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