Memoirs of General Miller: in the service of the republic of Peru, Volume 1

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1829 - Peru
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Page 428 - I observed a great effervescence among the people, like something which either precedes or follows a popular commotion ; and as I entered the large inn of the city, I was surrounded by inhabitants of almost all classes. " I here learned that the French captain who had arrived yesterday had brought intelligence of every thing which had taken place in Spain in favour of France ; that he had announced the accession in the Spanish throne of Joseph Bonaparte, and had brought orders to the government from...
Page 421 - ... of a private individual, and no other. " With respect to my public conduct, my compatriots (as is generally the case) will be divided in their opinions — their children will pronounce the true verdict. " Peruvians ! I leave your national representation established ; if you repose implicit confidence in it you will triumph, if not, anarchy will swallow you up. " May success preside over your destinies, and may they be crowned with felicity and peace. Free Town, September, 20th, 1822. (Signed)...
Page 430 - Spain, to recover the rights of which they were despoiled, and invest themselves with the high character of a nation, free and independent of King Ferdinand VII., his successors, and the mother country.
Page 248 - But the two launches, which constituted the only means of disembarkation, appeared very inadequate to the effectual performance of such an attempt. Major Miller, with forty-four marines, pushed off in the first launch. After overcoming the difficulties of the heavy swell, an accumulation of sea-weed, in comparatively smooth water, loaded the oars at every stroke and impeded the progress of the assailants, who now began to suffer from the effects of a brisk fire from the party stationed at the landing-place....
Page 247 - Cochrane's object, therefore, was to wait until the evening, when the wind would have abated, and the swell subsided. The Spaniards, who had already begun to entertain suspicions, ordered the vessels to send a boat ashore ; to which it was answered, they had lost them in the severe gales they had encountered. This, however, did not satisfy the garrison, which immediately fired alarm guns, and expresses were despatched to the governor at Valdivia. The garrisons of all the southern forts united at...
Page 178 - It is about two hundred and fifty feet long, and just wide enough to admit a carriage. It is upon the principle of suspension, and constructed where the banks of the river are so bold as to furnish natural piers. The figure of the bridge is nearly that of an inverted arch. Formed of elastic materials, it rocks a good deal when passengers go over it. The infantry, however, passed upon the present occasion without the smallest difficulty. The cavalry also passed without any accident by going a few...
Page 347 - The master, disliking the embargo, got ready to slip his cable and put out to sea, intending to land the soldiers when and where it suited his convenience. Being informed of the circumstance, upon entering Arica, Miller instantly went on board unaccompanied. He offered the most liberal terms, which were pertinaciously rejected. This refusal rendered the services of the other three vessels unavailable, as they could not have taken off the whole of the troops. During an animated conversation...
Page 399 - The ignobler Moors from far his rage provoke With woods of darts, which from his sides he shook. Meantime your valiant son, who had before Gained fame, rode round to every mirador; Beneath each lady's stand a stop he made.
Page 251 - ... pursuers, retreated into the Corral. This castle, however, was almost immediately stormed by the victorious Patriots, who, favoured by a part of the rampart which had crumbled down, and partly filled up the ditch, rushed forward, and thus obtained possession of all the western side of the harbour. The Royalists could retreat no farther, for there the land communication ended. One hundred Spaniards were bayoneted ; and about the same number, exclusive of officers, were made prisoners. Such was...
Page 243 - would make it appear that the attempt to take Valdivia is madness. This is one reason why the Spaniards will hardly believe us in earnest, even when we commence ; and you will see that a bold onset, and a little perseverance afterwards, will give a complete triumph ; for operations unexpected by the enemy are, when well executed, almost certain to succeed, whatever may be the odds ; and success will preserve the enterprise from the imputation of rashness.

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