Memoirs of Rear-Admiral Paul Jones: Now first compiled from his originals journals and correspondence; including an account of his services under Prince Potemkin, Volume 2

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Page 154 - Judge, my prince, of my astonishment and dis tress of mind, when I yesterday was informed that the day before, the governor of the city had sent for my advocate, and forbidden him, at his peril, or any other person, to meddle with my cause ! " I am innocent before God ! and my conscience knows no reproach. The complaint brought against me is an infamous lie, and there is no circumstance that gives it even an air of probability. " I address myself to you with confidence, my prince, and am assured...
Page 126 - He was avaricious and ostentatious, despotic and obliging, politic and confiding, licentious and superstitious, bold and timid, ambitious and indiscreet, lavish of his bounties to his relations, his mistresses, and his favourites, yet frequently paying neither his household nor his creditors. His consequence always depended on a woman, and he was always unfaithful to her. Nothing could equal the activity of his mind, nor the indolence of his body. No dangers could appal his courage, no difficulties...
Page 262 - I will not fail to write whenever I have any thing worth your reading ; at the same time, may I hope to be honoured now and then with a letter from you, directed to Philadelphia. I was selfish in begging you to write me in French, because your letters would serve me as an exercise. Your English is correct, and even elegant.
Page 312 - American liberty — of that liberty which so gloriously ushered in our own. The Semiramis of the North had drawn him under her standard, but Paul Jones could not long breathe the pestilential air of despotism ; he preferred the sweets of a private life in France, now free, to the e'clat of titles...
Page 186 - Chevalier Littlepage, now here on his way from Spain to the north, has promised me a letter to you on my subject, which I presume will show the meanness and absurdity of the intrigues that were practised for my persecution at St. Petersburg. I did not myself comprehend...
Page 332 - The first lieutenant of the Serapis coming up at this moment, inquired of Captain Pearson whether the ship along-side had struck to him ? To which I replied, ' No, Sir, the contrary ; he has struck to us.' The lieutenant renewing his inquiry, ' Have you struck, Sir ?' was answered, ' Yes, I have.' The lieutenant replied, ' I have nothing more to say ;' and was about to return below, when I informed him he must accompany Captain Pearson on board the ship along-side.
Page 127 - He was morose to all that stood in awe of him, and caressed all such as accosted him with familiarity. . . . None had read less than he ; few people were better informed. . . . One while he formed the project of becoming Duke of Courland ; at another he thought of bestowing on himself the crown of Poland. He frequently gave intimations of an intention to make himself a bishop, or even a simple monk. He built a superb palace, and wanted to sell it before it was finished. In his youth he had pleased...
Page 285 - France, and I sent them by duplicates. But you say nothing of having received any letters from me ! Summon, my dear friend, all your resolution! Exert yourself, and plead your own cause. You cannot fail of success; your cause would move a heart of flint! Present my best respects to your sister. You did not mention her in your letter ; but I persuade myself she will continue her tender care of her sweet godson, and that you will cover him all over with kisses from me ; they come warm to you both from...
Page 258 - King, to his ministers, and to this generous-minded nation. I should be greatly proud to owe my success to your own good offices; and would gladly share with your husband the honour that might result from our operations. I have within these few days had the honour to receive from his Majesty the cross of Military Merit, with a sword that is worthy the royal giver, and a letter which I ardently wish to deserve. I hold the sword in too high estimation to risk its being taken by the enemy; and therefore...
Page 159 - I felt compassion for her ; I advised her not to enter upon so vile a career, gave her some money, and dismissed her ; but she was determined to remain. '" Impatient at this resistance, I took her by the hand and led her to the door ; but, at the instant when the door was opened, the little profligate tore her sleeves and her neck-kerchief, raised great cries, complained that I had assaulted her, and threw herself into the arms of an old woman, whom she called her mother, and who, certainly, was...

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