Memoirs of an Arabian Princess

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Doubleday, Page, 1907 - Arabian Peninsula - 227 pages
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Contents

I
3
II
18
III
31
IV
43
V
53
VI
65
VII
75
VIII
85
XII
126
XIII
133
XIV
143
XV
158
XVI
167
XVII
174
XVIII
190
XIX
199

IX
92
X
101
XI
112
XX
203
XXI
211

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Page 83 - the name of the most merciful God. Praise be to God, the Lord of all creatures, the most merciful, the King of the day of judgment. Thee do we worship, and of Thee do we beg assistance. Direct us in the right way, in the way of those to whom Thou hast been gracious, not of those against whom Thou art incensed, nor those who go astray.
Page 234 - Such proofs of attachment and devotion, combined with the blissful joy of having seen my dear country once more, have sustained my soul in many a heavy hour, have made my voyage an event of lifelong happiness, and I cannot but humbly offer repeated praise and gratitude to God for His great goodness and mercy.
Page 176 - The Arab has no idea of classifying diseases. He knows but two kinds, "pains in the body" and "pains in the head." To the first category belong any complaints affecting stomach, liver, or kidneys, while under the second he lists all manifestations of distress assailing the head, whether sunstroke or softening of the brain.
Page 104 - on the heights of the mountains or in the depths of the
Page 173 - My sister Chole, after protracted suffering from an obstinate, unceasing earache, was to see a noted Persian doctor, and I got permission to attend the consultation. Chole was wrapped up so that she could not be
Page 175 - No one ever discovers the fundamental cause of an illness, and if domestic nostrums prove unavailing, sometimes a European doctor will be sent to for medicine. But he is in an awkward
Page 172 - PEOPLE grow up in Eastern lands without particular attention to any rules or care of health. Only severe illness calls forth aid to nature, but the means employed are pure hocus-pocus.
Page vi - actually a Sultan's daughter who escaped from her country and went to live in Germany as the wife of a German merchant? So romantic a supposal seeming to require confirmation, the translator wrote to an English government official well-versed in matters pertaining to the African colonies. He received this reply, whose full import will only be appreciated after perusal of the memoirs:
Page 113 - as it is understood by Europeans, means nothing in Zanzibar. National income and national revenue being unknown there, everything levied by way of imposts was my father's own personal property.
Page 169 - with however the ailing ear left uncovered. Then she seated herself on a divan. On her right my father assumed his position, standing, and my brother Khaled on her

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