Memoirs of the Late William Cobbett, Esq., M.P. for Oldham: Embracing All the Interesting Events of His Memorable Life, Obtained from Private and Confidential Sources : Also, a Critical Analysis of His Scientific and Elementary Writings, Volumes 1-2

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J. Saunders, 1836
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Page 231 - art my father, and to the worm, thou art my mother and my sister.' The parentage of Rush was not extremely well calculated for sending him into the world with that independence of mind, which, among persons of low birth, is certainly the
Page 438 - John, Lord Redesdale. In contempt of our said Lord the King and his laws, to the evil example of all others in the like case offending, and against the peace of our said Lord the King, his crown and dignity. 2nd
Page 188 - PAINE. I do not believe in the creed professed by the Jewish church, by the Roman church, by the Greek church, by the Turkish church, by the Protestant church, nor by any church that I know of. My own mind is my own church.
Page 103 - of it, it delighted me beyond description, and it produced what I have always considered a sort of birth of intellect. I read on until it was dark, without any thought of supper or bed- When I could see no longer, I put my little book in
Page 240 - against him, and also for his there appearing and entering special bail in the cause, if special bail was originally requisite therein, it shall then be the duty of the state court to accept the surety, and proceed no further in the case.
Page 224 - of which I could see the prodigious sand hill, where I had begun my gardening works. What a nothing! But now came rushing into my mind all at once, my pretty little garden, my little blue smock frock, my little nailed shoes, my pretty pigeons, that I used to feed out of my
Page 223 - Here I used to take the eggs and young ones of crows and magpies. This hill was a famous object in the neighbourhood. It served as the superlative degree of height' as high as Crooksbury Hill' meant with us, the utmost degree of height. Therefore the first object that my eyes sought
Page 444 - and Privy Counsellor as aforesaid, had recommended a base and disloyal man to the favour of our said Lord the King. And in another part thereof, according to the tenor and effect following, (that is to say): "It was said of Lord Kenyon, that he loved money. If so, he loved his own money only, and not
Page 35 - had on Friday made shift to have a halfpenny in reserve, which I had destined for the purchase of a red herring in the morning ; but when I pulled off my clothes at night, so hungry then as scarcely to be able to endure life, I found that
Page 102 - or other, left threepence in my pocket. With this for my whole fortune, I was trudging through Richmond in my blue smock frock, and my red garters tied under my knees, when staring about me, my eye fell upon a little book in a bookseller's window, on the

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