Memoirs of the Life and Administration of Sir Robert Walpole, Earl of Orford, Volume 1

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T. Cadell, jun. and W. Davies, 1800 - Great Britain
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1800 / - / 138

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Page 220 - Indies, or any indorsement or assignment thereon, or on any bond or obligation under the common seal of the governor and company of merchants of Great Britain, trading to the South Seas and other parts of America...
Page 283 - In this situation of affairs we should be extremely wanting to ourselves, if we neglected to improve the favourable opportunity which this general tranquillity gives us, of extending our commerce, upon which the riches and grandeur of this nation chiefly depend. It is very obvious, that nothing would more conduce to the obtaining so public a good, than to make the exportation of our own manufactures, and the importation of the commodities used in the manufacturing of them, as practicable and easy...
Page 350 - ... measures with me, joined to that of having once openly declared for him, would have created a point of...
Page 17 - England as by law established, that, in case the crown and imperial dignity of this realm shall hereafter come to any person, not being a native of this kingdom of England, this nation be not obliged to engage in any war for the defence of any dominions or territories which do not belong to the crown of England, without the consent of parliament...
Page 17 - That after the said limitation shall take effect as aforesaid, no person born out of the kingdoms of England, Scotland or Ireland or the dominions thereunto belonging (although he be naturalized or made a denizen, except such as are born of English parents) shall be capable to be of the privy council, or a member of either house of parliament...
Page 378 - Wood, a patent for coining farthings and halfpence, to the value of 100,000 flerling, on certain terms" which the patentee was bound to follow. William Wood, who in the party language of Swift is ridiculed under the denomination of a hardware man and a low mechanic, was a great proprietor and renter of iron works in England.
Page ii - The blood of man should never be shed but to redeem the blood of man. It is well shed for our family, for our friends, for our God, for our country, for our kind. The rest is vanity .. the rest is crime.
Page 341 - This clasp the diamond girdle round his waist ; His breast, with rays, let just Godolphin spread, Wise Burleigh plant the plumage on his head, And Edward own, since first he fix'd the race, None...
Page 110 - It is with just resentment we observe that the pretender still resides in Lorrain, and that he has the presumption, by declarations from thence, to stir up your majesty's subjects to rebellion. But that which raises the utmost indignation of your commons is, that it appears therein, that his hopes were built upon the measures that had been taken for some time past in Great Britain. It shall be our business to trace out those measures whereon he placed his hopes, and to bring the authors of them to...

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