Memoirs of the Life and Negotiations of Sir W. Temple ...: Containing the Most Important Occurrences ... from the Year 1665 to the Year 1681. : With an Account of Sir W. Temple's Writings

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W. Taylor, 1714 - 424 pages
 

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Page 379 - ... part of it more particularly, were the inclination of my youth itself, so they are the pleasure of my age ; and I can truly say that, among many great employments that have fallen to my share, I have never asked or sought for any...
Page 319 - But one chief regard, necessary to this constitution, was that of the personal riches of this new council ; which, in revenues of land or offices was found to amount to about three hundred thousand pounds a year ; whereas those of a house of commons are seldom found to have exceeded four hundred thousand pounds. And authority is observed much to follow land...
Page 242 - ... such wives as were generally in the Courts of this age: that if he should meet with one to give him trouble at home, it was what he should not be able to bear, who was like to have enough abroad in the course of his life: and that, after the manner he was resolved to live with a wife, which should be the best he could, he would have one that he thought likely to live well with him, which he thought chiefly depended on her disposition and education...
Page 310 - Christendom, and the war might have been carried on, till France had yielded to the treaty of the Pyrenees, and left the world in quiet for the...
Page 223 - His Fortunes were not in a Condition for him to think of a, Wife...
Page 261 - Prince saw him; and concluded, this old man's business and his were too like one another, and that he ought, however, to do just as the old man did, without knowing what would succeed, any more than what did in the poor man's...
Page 200 - Meafures we had entered into upon the Triple Alliance. The Sum of Money given his Majefty by the States, though it was not confiderable in it felf, and lefs to the King, by the greateft Part of it being applied to the Prince of Orange's Satisfaction for his Mother's Portion that had never been paid ; yet it gave the King the whole Honour of the Peace...
Page 282 - I never yet was deceived in judging of a man's honesty by his looks . . . and if I am not deceived in the Prince's face, he is the honestest man in the world, and I will trust him, and he shall have his wife...
Page 261 - ... a canal; that, when with the last endeavours he was just got up to the place intended, the force of the eddy carried him quite back again ; but he turned his boat as soon as he could, and fell to his oars again ; and thus three or four times while...
Page 286 - Peace ihould be made upon thefe Terms, all to be reftor'd by France to the Empire and Emperor that had been taken in the War } the Dutchy of Lorrain to that Duke ; and all on both Sides between France ^ • 4->V-4...

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