Memoirs of the Life and Writings of the Abate Metastasio: In which are Incorporated, Translations of His Principal Letters, Volume 2

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G. G. and J. Robinson, 1796 - Librettists
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Page 121 - And they have spoken against me with false tongues : they compassed me about also with words of hatred, and fought against me without a cause.
Page 388 - All comes united to th' admiring eyes ; No monftrous height, or breadth, or length appear ; The Whole at once is bold, and regular. Whoever thinks a faultlefs piece to fee, Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er fhall be.
Page 170 - Increased the strings, and sweeter charm'd the ear: Thus poetry precipitately flow'd, And with unwonted elocution glow'd; Pour'd forth prophetic truths in awful strain, Dark as the language of the Delphic fane. The tragic bard, who for a worthless prize Bid naked satyrs in his chorus rise, Though rude his mirth, yet labour'd to...
Page 43 - Aria d'abilita or di bravura which has been applauded in a former drama, without the least attention to the preceding recitative, or business of the scene. These airs taken out of their original niche, when translated in the book of the opera, continue to incline the good people of England to imagine the words of an opera to be all nonsense ; and that even the musical dramas of Metastasio are as absurd and subject to ridicule as those which Addison has described with so much pleasantry in the 'Spectator.
Page 301 - ... and gallant females, all equally read them, and all find them equally beautiful. His moral maxims are daily cited, and his productions are become the code of lovers.
Page 58 - I return with a mutual and most constant reciprocation. I love and esteem him as much as it is possible for a man to be loved and esteemed, who has so far surpassed all his peers, not only by his excellence in the charming art which he professed, but by the uncommon virtues of his mind, which have rendered him amiable and admirable in every situation into which fortune has thrown him.
Page 365 - Jimilar to thofe of fpeech. That this was peculiarly the character of the dramatic mufic of the...
Page 43 - ... poor dramas from the injuries which they daily suffer in all the theatres of Europe, from those ignorant and vain vocal heroes and heroines who, having substituted the imitation of flageolets and nightingales to human affections, render the Italian style a national disgrace, in the opinion of those countries which have been obliged to us for all their knowledge of the art.
Page 378 - He feems plainly to have confidered 4 the the aftual murder of a mother, a fon, a brother, and the like, as incidents rather too horrible to be exhibited in any way. If - the deed muft be done, let it, he fays, if poffible — if the ftory will permit it — be done ignorantly.
Page 43 - Abbé at Saluzzo about 1760—70, "Thanks him and the ladies and gentlemen of Saluzzo for defending his poor dramas from the injuries which they daily suffer in all the theatres of Europe, from those ignorant and vain vocal heroes and heroines who, having substituted the imitation of flageolets and nightingales to human affections, render the Italian style a national disgrace, in the opinion of those countries...

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