Memorials of the Clan Shaw

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private circulation, 1871 - 65 pages
 

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Page 4 - An affectionate regard for their memory is natural to the heart; it is an emotion totally distinct from pride, — an ideal love, free from that consciousness of requited affection and reciprocal esteem, which constitutes so much of the satisfaction we derive from the love of the living. They are denied, it is true, to our personal acquaintance, but the light they shed during their lives survives within their tombs, and will reward our search if we explore them.
Page 4 - Nor need our ancestors have been Scipios or Fabii to interest us in their fortunes. We do not love our kindred for their glory or their genius, but for those domestic affections and private virtues that, unobserved by the world, expand in confidence towards ourselves...
Page 4 - And if the virtues of strangers be so attractive to us, how infinitely more so should be those of our own kindred, and with what additional energy should the precepts of our parents influence us, when we trace the transmission of those precepts from father to son through successive generations, each bearing the testimony of a virtuous, useful, and honourable life to their truth and influence, and all uniting in a kind and earnest exhortation to their descendants, so to live on earth that — followers...
Page 61 - UNSEEN. HERE are more things in Heaven and Earth, than we Can dream of, or than nature understands ; We learn not through our poor philosophy What hidden chords are touched by unseen hands. The present hour repeats upon its strings Echoes of some vague dream we have forgot ; Dim voices whisper half-remembered things, And when we pause to listen, — answer not. Forebodings come : we know not how, or whence, Shadowing a nameless fear upon the soul, And stir within our hearts a subtler sense...
Page 4 - Rightly viewed, as a most powerful but muchneglected instrument of education, I can imagine no study more rife with pleasure and instruction. Nor need our ancestors have been Scipios or Fabii to interest us in their fortunes. We do not love our kindred for their glory or their genius, but for those domestic affections and private virtues...
Page 35 - ... with the officer at their head, fire a platoon at fourteen of the wounded Highlanders, whom they had taken all out of that house, and bring them all down at once; and when he came up, he found his cousin and his servant were two of that unfortunate number. I questioned Mr Shaw himself about this story, who plainly acknowledged the fact, and was indeed the person who informed me of the precise number; and...
Page 35 - Duke very pointed intelligence of all the Prince's motions. In consequence of this, on the Saturday after the battle, he went to the place where his friend was, designing to carry him to his own house. But as he came near, he saw an officer's command, with the officer at their head, fire a...
Page 35 - Orelli, a brave old gentleman, who was either in the French or Spanish service. One Mr Shaw, younger of Kinrara, in Badenoch, had likewise been carried into another hut with other wounded men, and amongst the rest a servant of his own, who, being only wounded in the arm, could have got off, but chose rather to stay, in order to attend his master. The Presbyterian minister at Petty, Mr...
Page 4 - Nothing, as it appears to me, can iie less rational than the vulgar scoff at pedigree and genealogy. The adage so constantly quoted by the antiquary, that no one who could lay claim to family antiquity ever despised it, undoubtedly meets with exceptions ; but a reverence for the past, and a desire to establish a connection between it and self, are instinctive in human nature. And if instinctive, then, rightly directed, they must be ennobling principles.
Page 35 - ... to attend his master. The Presbyterian minister at Petty, Mr Laughlan Shaw, being a cousin of this Kinrara's, had obtained leave of the Duke of Cumberland to carry off his friend, in return to the good services the said Mr Laughlan had done the government; for he had been very active in...

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