Men in Contemporary Russia: The Fallen Heroes of Post-Soviet Change?

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Ashgate, 2006 - Social Science - 236 pages
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Rebecca Kay assesses how men in post-Soviet Russia are represented through media and popular discourses. Using case studies she explores the challenges which have arisen for men since 1991 and the ways in which their responses are shaped by and viewed through the prism of widely accepted attitudes towards gender. The lives and concerns of men in provincial Russia are examined through ethnographic fieldwork, combining extensive participant observation with in-depth interviews. The book reveals how individual men strive to maintain a sense of equilibrium between the activities in which they are engaged and the ways in which they are perceived, both by others and by themselves. The findings of the research have produced significant areas of contrast and comparison with the author's earlier work on women. This is drawn out throughout the book, placing the study of Russian men in a broader gendered context. The issues raised by the men mirror concerns discussed in men's studies literature and popular discourse beyond Russia. The book is therefore of interest to a wider international audience as well as contributing to ongoing interdisciplinary debates, in Russian Studies, Anthropology, Sociology and Human Geography, addressing the need for new approaches to understanding post-Socialist change.

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Contents

Being a man in contemporary Russia
19
Rite of passage or waste of time?
47
contested identity
127
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Rebecca Kay is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Central and East European Studies at the University of Glasgow, UK. She is author of Russian Women and their Organizations, Macmillan, 2000, winner of the Heldt Prize for the best book in Slavic Women‚e(tm)s Studies in 2000. In addition, she is author of a series of articles on gender in contemporary Russia.

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