Men of Blood: Violence, Manliness, and Criminal Justice in Victorian England

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Apr 3, 2006 - History - 316 pages
0 Reviews
This book examines far more thoroughly than ever before the treatment of serious violence by men against women in nineteenth-century England. During Victoria's reign the criminal law came to punish such violence more systematically and heavily, while propagating a new, more pacific ideal of manliness. Yet, this apparently progressive legal development called forth strong resistance, not only from violent men themselves but from others who drew upon discourses of democracy, humanitarianism and patriarchy to establish sympathy with "men of blood."
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

2 When Men Killed Men
40
3 Sexual Violence
76
A Growing Contrast
123
Drunkenness and Other Provocations
170
Adultery and the Unwritten Law
201
Probing the Mind of a Wife Killer
240
The New Reasonable Man and TwentiethCentury Britain
289
Index
293
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Martin J. Wiener is the Mary Jones Professor of History at Rice University. His previous books include Between Two Worlds: The Political Thought of Graham Wallas (1971), English Culture and the Decline of the Industrial Spirit (1980), and Reconstructing the Criminal (1990).

Bibliographic information