Menominee Drums: Tribal Termination and Restoration, 1954-1974

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University of Oklahoma Press, 2006 - History - 282 pages
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In 1961, the U.S. government terminated the Menominee Indians’ federal status as a recognized tribe, including rights to a self-governed reservation. The Menominees were not the only tribe subject to this injustice; the government’s action was part of its larger policy of termination, which aimed to assimilate all Native Americans into larger American society. For the Menominees, as well as for other tribes, the result was devastating; in addition to their loss of land, Native peoples lost their livelihoods, assets, and very identities.

In Menominee Drums, Nicholas C. Peroff explains how termination evolved and how it affected the Menominees. He also tells the astounding story of how the termination was reversed. Through an organized campaign called DRUMS, the tribe was able to regain its status of federal recognition.


 

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Contents

White America Tries to Assimilate the Indian
9
The Menominee Governing Elite
28
The Menominee Termination Act of 1954
52
The Implementation of Menominee Termination
78
Termination and Policy Performance
128
Impacts of the Menominee Termination Act
163
Policy Inputs into the Menominee Restoration Act
197
Termination Restoration and Indian Assimilation
225
Public Policy and Policy Cycles
239
Menominee Restoration Act
252
Index
277
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Nicholas C. Peroff is Professor of Public Administration at the L. P. Cookingham Institute of Public Affairs, University of Missouri--Kansas City.

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