Message of His Excellency, Frederick Smyth, Governor of the State of New-Hampshire, to the Two Branches of the Legislature, June Session, 1866

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G.E. Jenks, State printer, 1866 - New Hampshire - 48 pages
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Page 25 - ... it shall be the duty of the legislators and magistrates, in all future periods of this government, to cherish the interests of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries and public schools...
Page 29 - The work of arranging and indexing these, commenced 28 some years ago by the late John Farmer, Esq., at the instance of the Legislature, should be continued ; and, when properly prepared, they should be printed, and thus rendered of easy access. An examination of the last two volumes of the NewHampshire Historical Society's collections, the expense of which was borne in part by appropriation made by former Legislatures, will show the desirableness and importance of the work proposed, — containing...
Page 28 - ... Librarian should be made personally responsible for every book under his care, and no volume should be allowed to be removed from the Capitol. PROVINCIAL RECORDS. I deem it my duty to direct your attention to the present condition of our Provincial Records for the period between 1680, when New-Hampshire became a separate royal Province, to the year 1775, when her people adopted a State government. These records are of great importance. Among other things they contain a large portion of the town...
Page 26 - Cambridge, public schools and grammar schools in the towns; to encourage private societies and public institutions by rewards and immunities for the promotion of agriculture, arts, sciences...
Page 30 - ... be supposed that it was ever the intention of the Legislature to include grandchildren if a child of the decedent survived him, but to exclude them merely because no child survived.
Page 25 - With that wisdom which has distinguished them in other matters, the founders of the commonwealth gave deserved prominence to this topic. Not content to leave it to the exigencies of future legislation, they took care to insert the idea in the • fundamental law. After recognizing the fact that " knowledge and learning are essential to the preservation of a free government...
Page 28 - ... importance. Among other things, they contain a large portion of the Town Grants, the Provincial Laws, and all measures taken by the people of New-Hampshire in the prosecution of the French and Indian wars ; yet, valuable as they are, they have never been put in a condition to render them useful, or insure their preservation. A part of them are in bound volumes and a part upon loose sheets, and they are all in manuscript, much of which it is difficult to decipher. They are greatly scattered, also,...
Page 40 - Since your last adjournment the New Hampshire troops in the service of the United States have all been mustered out, and our fellow-citizens, our friends and associates, who sprang to arms at the call of the country, and who survived the dread ordeal of battle and the more fatal dangers of the camp, have returned quietly to their accustomed pursuits and have been joyfully welcomed in a thousand happy homes. It is a matter of congratulation and surprise that soldierly qualities, unsurpassed in history,...
Page 7 - Leaving to be applied to the reduction of the State debt, $252,275 If this session of the Legislature should not be protracted beyond that of last year, and if all claims upon the Treasury which will be pressed upon your attention shall be most carefully scrutinized, and the most rigid economy and rigorous retrenchment of expenses are insisted upon in all the Departments, I have great confidence that this jratifying result may be realized.
Page 16 - While every tangible article in a man's possession is made to contribute to the general treasury, it becomes a • matter of vital interest to a very great majority of the people, that every one should bear a just share of the burdens. And even were there a small minority only who feel the unequal weight of this load, the universal sense of justice requires that it should be made as equal as the imperfection of human legislation will allow.

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