Metacognition in Educational Theory and Practice

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Douglas J. Hacker, John Dunlosky, Arthur C. Graesser
Routledge, 1998 - Education - 407 pages
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This volume presents the most current perspectives on the role of metacognition in diverse educationally relevant domains. The purpose is to examine the ways in which theoretical investigations of metacognition have recently produced a strong focus on educational practice.

The book is organized around four general themes relevant to education: metacognition and problem solving, metacognition and verbal comprehension, metacognition and the education of nontraditional populations, and metacognition and studentship. Chapter authors review current literature as it applies to their chapter topic; discuss theoretical implications and suggestions for future research; and provide educational applications. Each chapter describes testable theory and provides examples of how theory can be applied to the classroom. The volume will have wide appeal to researchers and students concerned with the scientific investigation of metacognition, and to practitioners concerned with the cultivation of learning and achievement in their students.

The unique contribution of this book to the literature on metacognition is its presentation of the most current research examining specific theoretical aspects of metacognition in domains directly relevant to education. This is especially valuable for the many researchers and practitioners who subscribe to the concept that by fostering metacognitive processes during instruction, more durable and transferable learning can be achieved.

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About the author (1998)

John Dunlosky is Associate Professor of Psychology at Kent State University. He received his Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Washington in 1993. He has been extensively involved in metacogntive research, both theoretical and applied, for over 15 years and has written journal articles and book chapters and has edited monographic volumes on the topic, including Hacker, Dunlosky, and Graesser's Metacognition in Educational Theory and Practice (LEA, 1998). He has worked with grants from the Department of Education, the National Institute on Aging, and elsewhere on applied cognitive research and applying metacognition to learning. He is on the editorial board of the newly established journal Metacognition and Learning.

Arthur C. Graesser is a professor in the Department of Psychology and the Institute for Intelligent Systems at the University of Memphis and is a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

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